Alternative to Titan for Conforming Production Audio

Discussion in 'Media Production' started by conleec, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. conleec

    conleec

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    Hello All,

    Is there an alternative to Titan for conforming 24 bit multi-wav production audio to 16 bit Avid AAFs? I love Titan, but can't quite justify the pricetag at this moment. Would love to find a slightly cheaper, even if less feature endowed, option.

    Chris
     
  2. bigtree

    bigtree musician, mixer, producer Moderator Has Studio Services

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    Wish I could help you, but a bit unclear on what you are trying to do. Its sounds like your are wondering if you can import 24bit files into a 16bit Avid format? I would love to own the Titan. Can you explain this a little better for me?
     
  3. conleec

    conleec

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    Hello Bigtree,

    No, I'm wondering if there's another way to automate the process of taking an imported 16 bit AAF from Avid and replace all the clips with the original 24 bit multi channel audio from the production mixer? Doing it by hand is painstaking, and Titan is freaking expensive. But I guess it's expensive for a reason...?

    Chris
     
  4. bigtree

    bigtree musician, mixer, producer Moderator Has Studio Services

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    Not being familiar with Titan, I'm still a bit unclear. Are you talking about importing or exporting a library? but would a System Ex dump work?
     
  5. conleec

    conleec

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    The process goes like this: the picture editor gets 16bit conversions of the production mixer's tracks. It's usually the comped track, with all the lavs, booms, etc, mixed to a single mono track. The picture editor then spends weeks or months editing the picture to this track. When the picture is locked, this track gets delivered to the sound department usually via an AAF export.

    At this point, the sound editor has to find a way to replace all the 16bit mono tracks with the original 24 bit recordings from the production mixer's recordings. The sound editor also has to have access to all the individual isolated tracks, instead of the comped track the picture editor was using.

    Titan offers a means of doing this, but costs a LOT. For a person such as myself who's dabbling in this field, it's a bit cost prohibitive. I'm simply wondering if anybody else has created an alternative method of doing this that doesn't cost so much.

    Chris
     
  6. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

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  7. conleec

    conleec

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    Thanks for the response, RemyRAD. But for a relative newbie, such as myself, would you care to elaborate? I assume you're referring to the field recorder capabilities of Pro Tools, correct? Unless I'm reading the manual incorrectly, that seems like a pretty tedious manual process. It'd be great if it could be automated somewhat.

    Chris
     
  8. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

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    Field recorder with ProTools? No, that's not what I meant. You are talking in terms of postproduction. Postproduction generally doesn't happen in the field. It generally happens in a controlled environment i.e. a control room, a living room, a bedroom, with speakers.

    All of this can be automated but automation requires proper inputting & manipulation of the automating features. Otherwise, garbage in, garbage out. Automation is a misnomer. You must automate something for it to be automated. There is no magic button you can press and have it all be done for you. Yes, everything is tedious & manual in programming any automation. But once countless hours are put into the automating process, when it plays back, it has been automated. Automation allows one to hit marks where they are supposed to be hit. Dynamically vary equalization along with time delays to create senses of motion. Create various time delays to create feelings of sounds coming from positional places. And it takes a huge tedious amount of time to accomplish that.

    And if you are trying to accomplish audio postproduction for video, ProTools is a good program to utilize that for. I've used other programs to do likewise but a lot of audio post guys for video utilize ProTools. That's also because ProTools is about the closest thing we have to an industry standard for video postproduction that can be interchanged conveniently between numerous studios and postproduction houses. It also pairs up well with Avid Media Composer installations especially since they come from the same company. In this business, tedious is our middle name. But thanks to our current computerization, one doesn't have to worry about the cumulative delays utilizing an Allison 65 K VCA-based, volume only automation system on an analog console anymore. And you think the computer thing is tedious eh? Better take a tranquilizer first then.

    I take Xanax before some of those sessions, .5 mg thank you. No coffee for me.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  9. conleec

    conleec

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    RemyRAD,

    Thanks again, but I think we're talking about two different things. I understand the process of mixing (and automating said mix) even though I'm just learning. What I'm trying to do is simply replace the 16 bit mono recordings from the Avid with the field recorder's original 24 bit multi-channel recordings so that I'm working with the very best source material when doing my mix.

    Titan will do this automatically by comparing TCs and file names from the Avid media against the original recordings and will build a new PT session from the field recorder's material. But it's nearly $2,000. I'm simply wondering if some enterprising young coder had taken it upon themselves to craft an alternative, even if less feature rich, option?

    Chris
     
  10. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

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    Doesn't the 24-bit field recorder utilize broadcast wave file format with time stamping? And shouldn't that coincide with the Avid? Well as an enterprising young coder had come up with a way, maybe it will only cost you $1000? I guess I'm just too used to doing everything manually myself? That's what postproduction is all about. You really can't expect to go out to the all-you-can-eat Chinese place and come back and have it done. Unless you're willing to spend $2000 for Chinese all-you-can-eat?

    I Sollie I no good fo ewu
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  11. conleec

    conleec

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    LOL, well thanks for the lesson on Post Production. I said I'm a newbie with Pro Tools, but I'm a professional feature film and television editor having worked in Hollywood for the past 15 years. I'm well acquainted with the ART of post production as a whole. As you say, if it's that important to me, perhaps I'll just spring for the $2k.

    Chris Conlee
    Editor
     
  12. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel

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    Sometimes software costs what it does for a reason. If this software saves time and energy and allows one to get the job done quicker with less fuss it is almost a no brainer to simply buy it. Chalk it up to the "cost of doing business".
     
  13. conleec

    conleec

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    Absolutely, Tom. I'm a big believer in people getting what's fair for their efforts. I'm also a big believer in competition, so I was simply inquiring if anybody knew of any competing products. It seems there are none, so I'll evaluate my time vs the savings offered by Titan and make a decision.

    Chris
     
  14. matthewfreedaudio

    matthewfreedaudio

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    The only two conforming options on the market, that I'm aware of, are Titan and Virtual Katy. They are expensive, yes, but they save a massive amount of time. Time=$$$$

    Buy the software.

    And why is the video editor using 16-bit files in this day and age? Avid has been able to handle 24-bit, multi channel audio for a long time. They made more work for themselves and you by converting the 24-bit production audio in to 16-bit.
     
  15. conleec

    conleec

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    That's true, of course. But even if we're cutting with 24 bit files, it's still typically only the comped track, so the sound editor / mixer has to conform the iso tracks to the cut.

    Chris Conlee
     
  16. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

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    I've got my eye on that anti-wow/flutter elimination software. A bit pricey yet.

    Tape transfers R us.
    Mx. Remy Ann David