Best Audio Recording Magazine?

Discussion in 'Studio Lounge' started by djpraz3, May 11, 2011.

  1. djpraz3

    djpraz3

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    I was wondering if anyone gets a subscription or knows about a good magazine for audio? Im a student and I do have instruments and recording equipment but would like to learn about more.
  2. Davedog

    Davedog Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Pacific NW

    TapeOp
  3. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Washington DC Virginia suburbs
    What Dave said and MIX magazine, EQ Magazine, Pro Sound News, Home Recordings magazine, AES journals, et al.. I first started reading DB Magazine back in 1971 or was that 1972? By 1978, MIX was a newspaper like periodical. Actually, I've been saving every MIX magazine since 1978 or sometime shortly thereafter. I still have my DB magazines from the early 1970s. Though I have not digitized everything but a lot of this is also available through the actual publishers. Many of these magazines are worthwhile to read over through the years. Great interviews of people and stuff. It will also provide you with a well-rounded knowledge of what came before you decided to get into the business. Now for some of us folks, this is a profession. For others, it's a hobby. For many, it's a professional hobby. This is all I do basically all I have done now for over 40 years. If I'm not a recording/mixing engineer/producer, I'm a broadcast engineer or camera guy, video editor, video mastering engineer, director, producer. Studio designer, installer. Maintenance engineer. You can't do just one thing in this business unless you want to remain a student the rest of your life. But then again, we are all students in this throughout our lives. None of us are ever done learning. I've enjoyed all of the above mentioned magazines and periodicals but they are certainly not gospel of any kind. This is a creative process, it ain't McDonald's. Your school should have already suggested these otherwise, you're wasting your money someplace. But then I've also had to teach the teachers. That's because, you see, they went to school to learn this junk and that's what they learned, junk.

    I figured out most of this myself by just listening and then having had a couple of lovely mentors over more than a 10 year span. And these weren't just any mentors. I got very lucky but I was also very smart and good to begin with. Some of us are born with certain innate talents that we don't even understand of ourselves. Other people need to hit the books but then they get stuck in the box. You've got to think outside the box to be creative at anything. Otherwise you might as well be putting tailpipes on cars everyday. I'd like to teach on the university level since I know guys that have PhD's in recording arts and sciences and they know nothing. That doesn't mean they're all like that. Unfortunately, today there are a huge amount of them like that, that are. A PhD from the University of Maryland told me at their studio once, when I came in to mix a TV soundtrack for a live rock 'n roll client of mine who is doing their studio album with him. He indicated that I could not obtain a good or valid mix without putting this awful Valley People Digital Limiter across my 2 track stereo Mix bus. I told him to patch it out and he argued that with me. Suffice it to say in less than three hours time, I essentially mixed the entire CD for the TV show I had gotten my live client on in NYC. Needless to say Mr. PhD was completely amazed at how marvelous my mix sounded without the necessary Digital Limiter. I also scolded Mr. PhD for not having a recording console in this University of Maryland studio since studio recording was being taught. Instead, based on his own investigations on printed product specifications he believed that this particular PA console was superior sonically to any recording console. This is what you have to be careful of. He was dead wrong stupid. I suggested an MCI JH 400 with perhaps some upgrade to a different IC chip. I suggested this because the JH 400 was an actual recording console configured for recording studios. The PA console is not configured for a recording studio. And this was Mr. PhD at University of Maryland. I also had issues with another chief engineer at the local multimillion dollar studio in the DC area. I was coproducing a jazz album that I didn't bother to bring my own Ribbon microphones. Oooops! My bad. When I told him what I wanted on the singer & the trumpet player he kindly informed me that ribbon microphones were no good, because they were noisy. He got his bachelor's of science degree from Full Sale (Sail), in Winter Park Florida, where they have no winter. That should have given away some kind of clue in and by itself. But that's sort of like hitting the beach in the Antarctic Circle in a bathing suit. Not wise. But because I have no college degree, I can't officially teach on the university level. Funny, I know plenty of very successful musicians that never went to school for music. But if you get famous enough at something, somebody may just offer you a job at a university teaching even if you are a high school dropout. Unfortunately that's not me. I was successful, I'm really good but perhaps I'm not as notorious as I would have liked? It's okay, I've still done well. Remember, school isn't there necessarily to teach you anything. You are there to verify what you already know and have already learned and you want to make sure you figured it out correctly for yourself. So yeah, I got a degree in broadcasting, 4 years after I had been working in broadcasting & recording studios. But it's not a real degree because the school was not yet University of Maryland certified when I went. And being ADD I also didn't have to learn anything about plants or cows, dirt or rock's. You know all that extra wonderful stuff that has no real validity in any real-life way.

    Bart Simpson is my hero and I really think that Yogi Bear is a fine actor. And don't forget, always question authority.

    The real deal.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
    Last edited: May 12, 2011
  4. jittenbach

    jittenbach

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maryland
    Sound on Sound
  5. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Washington DC Virginia suburbs
    I knew I forgot one!
  6. janealex

    janealex

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am also agree with jittenbach' opinion that as you are new to this industry and "Sound on Sound" would be the best option for you. You will learn a lot of new ideas from there.
  7. lambchop

    lambchop

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2003
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey (right outside the Big Apple!)
    Home page:
    I'll second TapeOp, myself!
Similar Threads: Best Audio
Forum Title Date
Studio Lounge What's the best way to demo your audio skills on CD? Oct 9, 2008
Studio Lounge Best double album ever? Feb 11, 2013
Studio Lounge Second best selling instrumental band of all time? Nov 21, 2010
Studio Lounge The Best Rock Album We Never Heard Oct 23, 2009

Share This Page