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Acoustic Guitar Pickups

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by Jeremy Sicely, Jan 23, 2004.

  1. Hello, I am currently recording a project with an acoustic guitar player who really moves alot and I have been faced with the task of getting a good sound out of a typical transducer style pickup (powered with built in eq etc.) He plays live with a Crate acoustic guitar amp and it sounds quite good. I am either going to record the guitar (line out of amp) mic the guitar amp or both. Is this all I am left with? Anybody had any run ins with these? Thanks and this is my first posting!!
  2. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Jul 2, 2002
    77 Sunset Lane.
    No chance of getting the guitar player to hold still? I have run into this before... actually what is most likely happening (I am makeing an assumption here) is the guitar player thinks the sound of that crate and his pickup is "the schnizzel" and is unwilling to make an attempt at recording with a mic. Bouncing around like a geek is a good way to keep you from micing him up correctly. This may be moot because I would venture anyone who uses a crate amp doesn't have a very good acoustic guitar in the first place (another assumption on my part).

    So, what can be done? Well, you can just mic the amp ... and get that clacky peizeo guitar pickup sound, or smack the guitar palyer around until he sits still and mic the guitar properly, or you can use an omnidirectional mic placed a few feet off of the guitar. This requires that the room you are recording in sounds pretty good as you are going to pick up a lot of the sound from the room.. good luck, I don't envy you.
  3. Midlandmorgan

    Midlandmorgan Active Member

    Jul 21, 2002
    Actually, we track the guitar's pickup (either a piezo thru a Fishman pre, or a Duncan through an external pre) along with the mics...blend to taste...

    If you have the room (acoustically and physically) you might set the mic back a bit more and see if you can work with that...

    If none of these work, beat him senseless.
  4. TanTan

    TanTan Guest

    A moving guitar player is almost a daily problem, i have a technique that might work for you.

    Take different 3 recording channels,
    1 the guitar pickups
    now , place the guitar player exactly in the center of the room, use one cardioid mic (not hyper cardioid) place it in the niddle of the guitar (bitween the nrck and the hole) which is the middle of the room as well, take another figure of eight kind of mic on top of the cardioid one, to take the to sides of the guitar and the room sound.
    When mixing , duplicate the figure of eight mic track and take both figure of eight channels hard left and right on your board and swich the phase of one of them , mix the cardioid mic in the center , in this way (in case the guitar player is in the excact center of the room) if the guitar player moves, its not a real issue in the mix because he will get the same room reflections, but ,a the cardioid mic and the guitar's pickups with the figure of eight channels to chek what of the will be better , because if he will move too much the cardioid will not be that usefull , but if the two mics wont be too close to the source it usualy not that big problem , just blend the mics right and it will work just fine. :w:
  5. shortyprs

    shortyprs Guest

    I'm trying to find an article in one of the guitar magazines where David Lindley described his set up. At the time, I was thinking it might help with a "moving" target. Otherwise, I've actually "dead body" style duct taped people in place. If you can't duck it.....!
  6. I have had conversations with the guitar player and he is going to sit down on a bar stool which should work great as far as I can see however, I am going to try the micing techniques.
  7. I will watch out for sqeaky seats WD-40!!!!

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