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AEA R84?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by jayjames, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. jayjames

    jayjames Guest

    I've got about $1400 to spend on mics for a new home studio, and I am considering getting an AEA R84, which will blow about $900 of my budget. I've read many great reviews of this mic that rave about how it sounds fantastic on almost everything. The other option I've been considering is a stereo pair of AKG 414's, which I can get for around $1000. The only mics I currently have are dynamic vocal mics (SM58, SM57, Beta58). Please help me decide what my major purchase should be, and what else to consider for the rest of my budget. Whichever mics I go with, they'll be used to record everything. Thanks.
    Jay
     
  2. maintiger

    maintiger Well-Known Member

    A pair of C414's will definitely be more versatil than the ribbon- Get the r84 later for a different flavor. I own an RCA D77 ribbon and It sure would be limiting if that was my only mic. However, in some instances it just can't be beat.
     
  3. jayjames

    jayjames Guest

    Maintiger, I've heard the R84 has a different character than the older RCA mics (it's not actually a clone), and is more multi-functional. Have you ever heard this newer mic?
    Jay
     
  4. maintiger

    maintiger Well-Known Member

    That's what they say but I haven't heard it...
    I am sure this is a great mic, my 77 sure is. A C414 should be more versatil IMHO but hey, its your $$$, get what you want. Another mic that I have been very happy with is the Rode K2. very versatil and its only about 600 bucs-
    I am thinking of getting another one for the pair-
     
  5. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    If your only 2 choices are the R84 or 2 AKG 414's, then go with the 414's.

    I love my R84's but if this was my next mic purchase and as you said "they would be used to record everything, then the 414's make the most sense.

    Like maintiger said, get the R84 later. You won't be dissappointed in it, but will find that it really shines on the right source.

    Good Luck,

    Chris
     
  6. jayjames

    jayjames Guest

    Thanks for the replies Xavier and Chris. I really appreciate it. Point taken re the 414's for versatility. Let me give you guys a bit more background info on what I've got and what I'd like to do.

    I'm putting together a home studio mainly for personal use. Of course I've also got grand dreams of commercial expansion, but for now I'll be recording myself and my measly little band. For now, I'll compromise being able to record live bands for having higher quality equipment, and thus fewer channels. So far, I've got a powerful PC, a LynxTwo card with the ADAT expansion card, a set of Yamaha NS10 monitors, a UAD-1 card, and a Mackie board that I may or may not use for analog summing (problably not). I've also got a nice selection of guitar amps and keyboards, a Sonar Force 3003 drum kit, and a decent room to use as a live room to record in (not yet acoustically treated, however). What I still need are mics and mic preamps. I've set aside $1400 for mics and another $1400 for preamps. To start I was thinking I'd get a good two-channel preamp, a main vocal mic and a stereo pair of SD condensers. Maybe I'll add a cheap Behringer ADA8000 to record the whole drum kit. Would this be the most intelligent way to start? BTW, I also have a few SM57's and a D112.

    Also, if I've only got two quality mic pres for drums, should I use them on the overheads, or for snare and kick?

    Thanks for the help.
    Jay
     
  7. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    Use the best mic pre's for your over-heads.
    They will be the biggest factor in the over-all drum sound.
    Chris
     
  8. Markd102

    Markd102 Well-Known Member

    That will depend on what that preamp is, the style of music being recorded, and how you want the drums to sound.

    But 8 times out of ten I'd agree with the pup. Use you best pres on overheads.
     
  9. sdelsolray

    sdelsolray Active Member

    Good place to start. You won't get everything you need with $1,400 plus $1,400. It's a good idea to buy quality gear now, instead of budget mics and pres that you'll end up dumping later. I think you're already thinking that way.

    For mics, a pair of SDs plus a good vocal mic is a great start. A pair of SM81s and an ADK TT (if it suits your vocals) is just an example of what you could eventually chose.

    There are numerous 2 channel pres out there in your price range that are great.
     
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