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Age of my MD421

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by Grooveteer, Aug 19, 2006.

  1. Grooveteer

    Grooveteer Guest

    Hi there,

    This week I bought an MD421HN from a guy that found it in his attic. I haven't really used for recording yet, but so far I like what I'm hearing.

    Just curious about when this thing was made. It's the white/grey 421HN model which was sold in the US as 421HL (high / low imp). It has the old script Sennheiser logo, it's made in Germany and the serial# is 17491.

    Did a search on the web, but I didn't find much useful info.

    Anyone? TIA

    Cheers!
    G
     
  2. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member

    Are you sure that it was sold in the States? I recall seeing photos of a white-looking 421 in old (German) Sennheiser catalogs from around the early 70s. I have been buying various models of the 421 since 1974, and I never encountered that version. So I'd say that there is a very good possibility that it was made before then.
    BTW, what type of connector is on it?
     
  3. Grooveteer

    Grooveteer Guest

    It's possible that this one is older than that. Did any of your 421 have the old 'script' Sennheiser logo?

    I believe that the 421HN (which stands for Hoch / Niedrig ) was called 421HL (High / Low) for the US market. The mic has dual impedance, high/low depending on how it's connected.

    The bass roll-off switch has only 2 positions.

    The connector is the 3-pin teuchel. (which fell apart when I replaced the dodgy old cable with a new one :| )
     
  4. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Well-Known Member

    Yes, I've had some of the "script" models. The connector that your mic has tells me that this mic was not sold in the US. And even the very first 421's that I bought (new, from Texas 'Slim' Richie's Warehouse Music in San Antonio) for $125.00 each (!) in 1974 had the 5-position "V-M" selector, and were XLR. So yours is ancient! Good thing it still sounds good, because they were notorious for going bad from a simple smack of the drumstick. Handle it with care and enjoy it.
     

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