1. Register NOW and become part of this fantastic knowledge base forum! This message will go away once you have registered.

All The Beautiful Music in The World

Discussion in 'Composing / Producing / Arranging' started by audiokid, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    I can only imagine how many hundreds of thousands of wonderful songs we all will never hear. All day long the main radio station plays the same top 40 songs over and over again for months in a loop. And most of them aren't worth even being called music.

    I was looking for music today, which lead to to researching a band member from a group I listen to in the 70's, to find he has gone through a few bands and is still playing at the age of 60. Had I not dug into wiki, I would never know.

    Its a downer we have allowed music to be pushed back that far and given so much credit the very undeserving .

    This song, not that is so amazing, but the message I am getting is telling me I am missing something from the crop of music today. I don't even care about the mix the way my head gets cluttered from electronic music. No what I mean. Its is just great because its people playing.
    I reflect and I feel connected to something better after listening to this.


    http://penguincafe.com/music/
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  2. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    Nice track. I'm with ya on this. There could be an argument that the T40 has always been this way, same old songs over and over... but I don't think that has always been true.

    There was a time when you could listen to current radio and hear a song like Smoke On The Water followed immediately by Eleanor Rigby.

    Today's current music seems so myopic to me. There's no diversity, or at least not nearly as much as there used to be, at a time when you could hear Steely Dan's FM played right after Clapton's Lay Down Sally or The Stone's Miss You, and the songwriting and musicianship was what counted first.

    I don't hear that diversity today, nor do I hear as much of the wide range of actual performance talent that I used to. These days, with all the modern tools available, it's not all that difficult to grab some tone deaf girl working at the burger joint down the street and turn her into the next big thing - as long as she's attractive, or has the potential for an image that can sell.

    The songs all seems to be cookie-cutter pop .... industry formula driven, DAW-based performance. Even "country" is stealing production chops from pop, with intentional auto-tune and digital stuttering.

    I've always been one of those guys who enjoyed listening to entire albums, very often finding hidden gems in the inner grooves that were meant to be "filler songs".... yet some of those were fantastic pieces. There's no doubt that those days are gone. Then again, I'm positive that the record insdustry doesn't care about how I feel at all. I'm a 50 something male, and that makes me a non-demographic to the labels. They couldn't care less about what I think. ;)

    I'm afraid to actually know about how many great songs are currently falling through the cracks, just because they don't meet the current "standards" set by those who drive the industry and consider American Idol to be the defacto source for new talent.

    Here's one to follow up what you posed, Chris... a gem from the past, here and gone within a matter of weeks in 1988, the first is the official MTV vid, the second one below it is them doing the same song live on Carson - no auto tune, no tricks, just talent:



     
  3. freightgod

    freightgod Active Member

    The thing is...

    Just a little over 100 years ago music was made in the home, if you wanted to hear it. Or at least someone in your neighborhood actually sang or played an instrument. Music wasn't just something you consumed, it was something you participated in.

    Now it's just a product, at least commercial music is. Tell me it isn't true, that right now there are about a dozen lawyers sitting around in some room somewhere planning what is going to be pushed down the pipeline and what people will 'love' sixteen months from now. The Grammy's are being programmed as we speak.

    I liken the music 'falling through the cracks,' like my own, to the 'music scene' from the late 1890's. It was happening all over the world, and still is today, but just because it isn't being sold and marketed doesn't make it any less valid. It makes it MORE real, honest and amazing, in my opinion. Luckily we at least do have a few tools for sharing and daring, such as the links we can post for each other on forums like this.
     
    audiokid likes this.
  4. freightgod

    freightgod Active Member

    Another random thought.

    I'll be singing the Easter Proclamation Saturday night in my local church, I may post a version to Youtube (it's hard to find one to practice along with). Anyway, something I've noticed over the years, is that in America, at least, people have become so accustomed to music being something that is "done by others" that congregations have stopped singing. Even church music has slowly become a 'performance' rather than a participatory thing.

    Maybe not in your neck of the woods...just goes along with the whole marketing concept that "Big Music" has sold to people. It has become something that 'the masses' have been led to believe they have to purchase in measured doses if they want to access it.

    Just my opinionated opinion.
     
  5. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    Oh man, i couldn't agree more. In fact, its one of the reasons I just love east coast musicians from the Maritimes . They all gather around and play the songs that their families, friends and grandparents sang about . They are connections to storied and history of suffering and hardship to love and understanding. We have created a business to empower children to spend money. It Dates parents and products as old and worthless. When you convince children to hate the music of the family history, it creates an economy for them alone. Which is easily put into a market group on a shelf.
     

Share This Page