At the risk of sounding stupid.....

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by OTRjkl, Mar 14, 2002.

  1. OTRjkl

    OTRjkl Guest

    Ok, I'll ask it:

    Brad, you have used the term 'dbfs' on a number of occaisions. Would you mind explaining what the 'fs' stands for? Thanks.

    BTW - I noticed on the Ardent website that one of the CD covers that pops up on rotation on the front page is that of the band 'Seven Channels'. I just happen to be really good friends with their guitarist Dallas Perry. :cool: Did you get to do any work on that project?
     
  2. brad

    brad Guest

    ....
     
  3. Ronny Morris

    Ronny Morris Guest

    I might add to Brad's post, that many digital consoles, DAT recorders and hard disk recorders use common scale on LED or fluoro meters and not dBFS, when these devices hit red they are really -3dB. This 3dB buffer zone, for lack of a better word, allows a bit of leeway with peak transients, allowing safer gain adjustments. I view this as a good thing and knowing about it and how to work with it, can make your mixes a little hotter without the use of or before limiting. dBFS meters generally show red when the audio exceeds -0dBFS for 3 samples, some show red after an over is hit for one or two samples, but 3 seems to be the most common.
     

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