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Audio Engineering courses?

Discussion in 'Studio Lounge' started by gussy12, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. gussy12

    gussy12 Guest

    Hey all,
    First of all I'm new to the forum so let me say hi.

    I live in New Zealand and currently go secondary school, I am in my last year. Next your I was thinking about attending one of the few audio engineering courses available here. Recently I posted on a New Zealand music forum asking about which course was best. No one gave a definate answer but the general consensus was that I was better off doing my own thing and learning the ropes whilst quietly stocking up on gear.

    I am really at a loss on what to do, I really want to become an audio engineer, and currently spend a good amount of my time mixing bands, on the internet researching gear and techniques and messing around with my own pitiful equipment.

    My Question is: Is it better to get some sort of qualification in audio engineering or am I better off teaching myself the ropes. Also is employment very easy find in these kind of areas bearing in mind I am quite happy to leave New Zealand once or if I get a qualification.

  2. ahavill

    ahavill Guest

    Most of the people who will hire you to mix their project will only be interested in what you've done & who you've worked with. So, its wise to spend as much time as possible DOING things rather than reading about them.
    I think you should find an engineer or studio that is doing what you'd like to be doing. Tell them you are eager to learn, & willing to do whatever difficult/boring/low-pay work they've got. Most audio guys are good people who are happy to share what they know. If you keep doing this, you will learn a lot, and at the same time you will be meeting more & more pros, & be demonstrating your work ethic to them. At some point you will stop being the newbie who doesn't get paid much, and become someone who's proved themselves worthy of "real" work.
    And, don't get hung up on the recording studio world, which is getting smaller day by day anyway. Working in live sound, equipment sales/rental, broadcasting etc will keep you in touch music tech, and there are often more options open.

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