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Basic Question about Mic Pre's

Discussion in 'Preamps / Channel Strips' started by AwedOne, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. AwedOne

    AwedOne Guest

    Hi All.

    I have a basic question about the use of mic preamps. If I'm controling my DAW with a FW-1082 and I use an outboard preamp, do I run the output of the preamp into the mic ins on the 1082, or do I go thru the line ins? I'm guessing I don't want to pre-amp the output of the pre-amp with the inferior Tascam pre-amp, thus negating the value of the expensive outboard pre.

    All advice is appreciated as I'm just beginning to learn.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Don't run it in to the mic input, you're just going to unecessarily boost / color the sound of your "nice" preamp. Instead- use an XLR to 1/4" TRS cable in between the "nice" preamp, and a line input on the 1082, and take advantage of one of the 1082's balanced line inputs. Be sure to plug it in to one of the inputs that aren't ALSO XLR (mainly because these are the only preamps), leaving you 4 preamps for other use. Hope this helped.
     
  3. AwedOne

    AwedOne Guest

    Yes, thanks aliveatmyfuneral. It does.

    As a follow up question, can I make the assumption that using ONLY software plug-ins (effects, compression, channel strips, etc.) would be analougous to trying to reproduce the sound of an Ampex 8-track tape machine on a 4-track cassette-based portastudio. IOW, is it possible to make recordings with that "big, professional sound" using software only?
    I don't want to waste my money on software if what I really need is hardware.

    thanks.
     
  4. For what I do, software is good enough, and in most cases, a tenth the price!! Seasoned pros will use mainly hardware- I went to a major studio here in Colorado a couple years ago, and they were recording to 2" tape, with NO software at all. If you can afford the hardware, well, do it. If you're poor like me, buy software. The most handy softwares I own are BFD, Ampeg SVX, digital phish (free, yes free), BBE sonic maximizer, Antares mic modeler, and a few others. I believe, that, if you are a good engineer, you will be able to achieve results with software that sound pretty damn professional, but... As your ear gets more and more interested in detail, you will notice the differences between your sound, and that of a professional studio, and you will never be happy with your recordings, no matter what you do. This is the sound addiction that will cause you to spend your life savings, lose your family, etc. Good luck!
     
  5. AwedOne

    AwedOne Guest

    I think there is a young lady on this forum that knows of a 12-step group for our "problem"! I'll ask her when I hit bottom.
     

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