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bass mix

Discussion in 'Bass' started by Imunk, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. Imunk

    Imunk Guest

    hello guys!

    I've got data for mixing from a band.
    Some of The recording data is full of dirt. I already advice them to record again some of them. but they its just for demo, so they think it's not necessary. But, this is a big problem to me. Because its mean, Hard work over day and night before mix.

    Some of them were vocal, kick, snare and bass!

    They always muddy, vocal honky, thin and full of noises. especially when i compress them.

    For the bass i just used eq to get best quality even the dirt come over!because i compress and cut the unnecessary freq, finally maximazer.But its still sound fatiquing.Sometime i use multiple eq, the reason is some eq max has 10 band (wave Q10).

    For all of them, i found i lost my highs!caused i try to remove the noises.

    Can somebody help for this?

    Thanks a lot.
  2. Pre Amp

    Pre Amp Guest

    IMHO you need to tell them that it needs to be re-recorded.
    When it's all said and done, if it sounds like sh!t, they will blame someone, and it won't be themselves for not listening to you.
    Get my point
    Reputation is everything
  3. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Sep 26, 2005
    I don't think you should worry about their recorded sound. Perhaps they want, or tried to emulate that "grungy sound" they have heard so often on other recordings?? I've heard so many purposefully distorted tracks in the past, it's quite amazing (and fun to do as an effect)! Work with it. It's what the customer wants, maybe, (even if they don't know what they want).

    They obviously thought they did a good job recording when they brought you their tracks to mix. Maybe they thought they did an awful job and thought that you could " Fixit in the mix". We all know, that really doesn't work. Don't stress. So give them a mix, with your bill and if they say it sounds awful, tell them you will give them a special deal to recut their tracks in your studio facility and suggest that they get involved with the re-mix. Otherwise, you probably don't want them back again anyhow? I doubt that your reputation will suffer?

    Grungy old (I think I need a bath?)
    Ms. Remy Ann David
  4. LexFactory

    LexFactory Guest

    If you are concerned about getting a bad rep for the quality of this mix, just make sure your name is NOT on it. Per the previous reply, that's dead on: many bands WANT that crappy sound. They're musicians, not mixing engineers; they may not be fighting for prestine and shiny audio. They might very well want it to sound really grungy and nasty.

    Additionally, you'd be surprised how few fans really notice. Fans sometimes notice absolutely fantastic mixes, usually notice complete-crap-mono-from-a-4-track mixes, but rarely notice anything in between. The casual listener just thinks it's supposed to sound that way. Don't kill yourself trying to clean up their mess. Just make it clear to them that it's THEIR mess and not yours.

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