Batch amplifying WAVs by average RMS output

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by a1studmuffin, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. a1studmuffin

    a1studmuffin Guest

    I'm working on a video game at the moment with 1500+ WAV files which represent all the bits of speech in our game. The problem is that they're not all consistent in average RMS output, varying anywhere from 3-9dB depending on which recording session they came from.

    Ideally, I'd love to find a way to batch process them all so that their average RMS output is consistent, as it's my understanding that this is the best measure of "perceived loudness".

    Anyone know a way? I've thought about using Cool Edit Pro to set up a batch script, but as far as I know you can only do this for peaks (normalising), not average RMS output.

    I'm on Windows XP, btw.

    Cheers. :)
  2. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Distinguished Member

    Jul 18, 2004
    Chicago area, IL, USA
    Home Page:
    I think WaveLab has a batch normalize that works with RMS settings...
  3. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Distinguished Member

    Sep 12, 2002
    NYC New York
    Home Page:
    I would say that that's what mastering is for, but 1500 files.... I'd be looking for a batch process too. Good luck.
  4. maintiger

    maintiger Distinguished Member

    Dec 3, 2003
    Whittier, California, USA
    Home Page:
    Peak on the mac has a batch processor for files... maybe you can find someone to run them for you-
  5. NolanVenhola

    NolanVenhola Guest

    wavelabs has a batch process. you just throw on the meta normalizer with RMS levels.

    Then you can batch master them with your preset mastering setup. Not ideal, but timely.
  6. a1studmuffin

    a1studmuffin Guest

    I ended up using Adobe Audition 1.5 to do it, there's a great batch WAV normalisation tool in there. And for those interested it's up to 3000+ assets now... (shakes head in despair)
  7. OTRjkl

    OTRjkl Guest

    3000+ !!!??? Geez...

    For future reference, I'm pretty sure SoundForge will do that also (although I never liked the way its Normalize function sounded...).

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