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Behringer C1-U noise

Discussion in 'Microphones' started by Denco, Jan 31, 2016.

  1. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    I bought Behringer C1-U microphone and I would like to ask about this noise I get when recording. You can hear the noise in this short recording https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxEYfpSTfDGJTTRDOEpMWkpTdGc/view?usp=sharing My question is, what causes that noise. Is it some natural noise of my room? Could it be the laptop? I have seen some videos online showing what this mic can do and some of them don't have that noise. I have even seen a video comparing unedited and edited sound from this mic and the unedited still sounded good. Could some of those windscreens help?

    Thank you.
     
  2. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    I'm sorry to say that's how those very cheap microphones are, not helped by this model having an unusually low output level and so needing a lot of digital gain at the mixing stage. The noise is not acoustic, it's electronic, and coming from inside the microphone, so a windscreen is not going to have any noise-reducing effect. For microphones of this type, there is probably a considerable variation in internal noise from one unit to the next, and you would have to try several in the hope of finding one that performed in a way that was acceptable to you.

    You ask what causes the noise. Take your pick from the technical list of: low-cost components, pared-down design, breakthough of USB and dc-dc converter noise into the audio section, all in addition to the commercial result of an emphasis on marketing while minimising the engineering and production costs.

    You are not alone in experiencing noise problems. I had a quick look at YouTube clips done with this microphone, and saw phrases in the comments such as "...I exported them [the vocal tracks] into FL Studio, where I used Edison to remove the background noise". One review on Amazon says "...the sound is pretty well, if you like background noise. I have additional filters for it and they didn't help, even in a sound proofed studio you can still detect lots of backing noise. It's impossible to hide the noise."

    Despite everything, the microphone seems reasonable value for its very little money, but only if you can find a way of using it that does not expose its shortcomings.
     
  3. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    Don't get me wrong, I had also watched some clips done with this mic before I bought it. I found some with noise and some without it, so I thought, that it is possible to do it without the noise (or at least not so loud noise). Like this one youtube.com/watch?v=QoCzmriLTjc - sounds much better than mine. If you imagine he used a pop filter, it would be pretty good. Could it be some editing of the recorded track?
     
  4. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    Judging by your YouTube clip, there is version of this microphone where you can speak into the end of it instead of into the side. It could be that one has lower internal noise. Otherwise, it's down to the variation between different units of the same type of microphone.
     
  5. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    So all I am left with is editing the track with noise removal? Could you post some recommendation on removing noise?
     
  6. pcrecord

    pcrecord Don't you want the best recording like I do ? Well-Known Member

    I agree with Boswell about the electronics.
    Altought, good gain staging and good mic technic will help. Be close and in front of the capsule, speak or sing loud to be able to lower the gain.
    if this isn't better, using a gate is a good option.
     
  7. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    You would have to tell us the range of things you would be recording. If it's just your voice, then using a noise gate effect or plug-in can work, but I happen not to like the results these give: audible noise during vocalising, silence when not. You could try using a compressor set for negative compression (i.e. expansion) so that the noise during the pauses in the speech is reduced but does not disappear completely. If there is going to be noise on the track, it's less disconcerting for the listener to have some continuing sound rather than hearing it artificially chopped about.

    By the way, I hope you are not following the YouTube example you linked to and that you are talking into the active side and not the end of this microphone.

    Unfortunately, the options for gain staging that Marco (pcrecord) talked about are not available with this microphone as it's a direct USB interface.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  8. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    Yes, I would record just voice. I use Audacity for recording, so I guess you meant this http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Nyquist_Effect_Plug-ins#Noise_Gate by noise gate plugin?
    No, I don't talk to the end of the microphone. The quality of the voice is actually pretty good. Just the mentioned noise is making the whole recording worse.
     
  9. pcrecord

    pcrecord Don't you want the best recording like I do ? Well-Known Member

    Some minimum volume adjustments can be done in the Windows. I know it's not really a gain adjustment, but by lowering the volume and having a louder source, you may end with less noises..
     
  10. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    That one is worth a try, since I see you can adjust the amount of gain reduction rather than simply gating off. My guess is that 15 to 20dB reduction would be enough to give a convincing result.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  11. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    Ok, I'll try to play with that plugin. Thank you for now, I'll come back with results.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  12. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    I'm not sure if I misunderstood the purpose of that plugin or I don't use it right, but ... It removes the noise, but just from the parts without me talking. Is that what you meant by this?
     
  13. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    Yes, exactly. However, my comment in that quote was about a noise gate that is on/off rather than a compressor/expander that can be adjusted for the amount of effect. You should at least be able to control the amount of noise that is heard during the non-vocal section so that it is less of a contrast with the vocal+noise sections. It won't change the ratio of vocal to noise during the vocalising
     
  14. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    As Bos mentuioned, that's what a standard noise gate does, where as an expander gives you a little more control over the noise during the vocal.

    Noise reduction software could work, but the good restoration progs aren't cheap.

    The DAW you are using isn't the problem. Good engineers can get any DAW to sound good if they know the ins and outs of the platform and how the tools of the trade work.

    In the end, your recording is only ever as good as what you record through... this means the mic and the preamp. If you are using cheaper quality gear, you'll always end up with a "cheap" sound. Sometimes that cheap sound can be an overall lackluster sound, where there's nothing particularly "wrong" with it, but it just doesn't sound very good. Other times, cheaper gear can present itself with actual problems - like electronic noise. If you are also using as lower gain output preamp, that means you're also having to turn the pre up to get the mic to its optimal level; and at hot levels, cheap pre's can add noise, too.

    Behringer C1's are a budget level mic, not priced very high, and lack the overall quality and output gain of nicer mics like Neumanns, AKG's, DPA's, ADK's, Cathedral Pipes, Telefunkens, etc... There's a reason you won't find a Behringer C1 mic at professional studios. Beyond their overall lack of fidelity, they're also very inconsistent. It's not uncommon to get one that sounds "okay" and then get the very next model in the serial number series that sounds terrible, or, maybe a touch better.

    Higher quality mics are usually hand constructed, using much nicer components and with much higher levels of quality control... and can be trusted to have a consistent sound and quality to them.

    Save your dollars and buy a good mic, and a good mic pre. Treated with respect, they'll last you for decades, and will sound great the whole time.

    Remember... Your quality will only ever be as good as the weakest link in your chain. ;)
     
  15. Denco

    Denco Active Member

    Ok, thank you for your help and advice. My mistake, that I trusted few of those videos, where this mic sounded good. Next time, I'll come for advice before buying the mic.
     
  16. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    Always a good choice. Better to get some educated/ experienced opinions first, than to trust a youtube vid. ;)
     
  17. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    How long have you had the mic... is it still under warranty? Can you get your money back? If so, you have some options that would work out better for you, and possibly for even just $50 - $75 more.
     

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