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Best / Lowest Price for Voice Recording Sofware?

Discussion in 'Vocals' started by RossT, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. RossT

    RossT Guest

    Hi all,

    Newbie here. Have sung all my life, all-state choir in high school, college choir, professsional theater in the Dallas / Fort Worth area. However, haven't sung at all in the past few years, and I'm interested in your opinions on reasonably priced PC software that allows you to record over your voice (Acapella) - an unlimited amount of times (or at least 16 times) while being able to control voice reverb as well.

    I realize I'll need a good microphone to plug into my PC - so mic suggestions also welcome. Basically I want to be able to play around with my voice either Acapella, or with an accompanyment CD with multiple voice tracks on top the existing recording. 20 years ago I was able to do this with a friend's Tascam device (Tim Rushlow from the country group, "Little Texas") - couldn't tell you what it was, but it was expensive.

    Pretty sure this can all be done with a PC, software and a good microphone in today's world. Would be interested in your suggestions, keeping cost in mind, and if you're willing to share, would also be interested in hearing your voice recordings via the recording solution you suggest....?

    Thanks in advance,
    Ross in Euless, TX
     
  2. jg49

    jg49 Well-Known Member

    Welcome to RO.

    A simple two channel interface, a good mic and decent headphones is most of what you will need provided you have a computer that you can dedicate to music of reasonable processing speed and ram. Recording the tracks is not much of an issue it is more an issue as your track count builds, it puts more load on the computer, though with multiple accapella takes there are ways around that also.
    So I would think you could get something of pretty reasonable quality for all of this for around $400-500.
    Nearly all interfaces these days come with some version of studio software so multi tracking is possible, reverb, chorus, compression and many other "tricks" are included.
     
  3. EricIndecisive

    EricIndecisive Active Member

    Here's a couple things you could look into:

    Firewire interface: Presonus Firebox or Firepod (FP10) - $200-400, I got my FirePOD with a free AT2020 Mic for $400 off ebay brand new
    Microphone: Sm57 or 58 - $100 each
    Software: Plenty of free stuff, Audacity is very popular. Adobe Audition, I think you can find the newest version for $100, the old probably cheaper.

    Obviously not THE route to take or anything, but as far as microphones and cheap software goes, those are quite popular.
     
  4. xX5thQuarterXx

    xX5thQuarterXx Active Member

    Reaper, i think its like $60. Its a GREAT program. Im a logic user and i almost wish i would have saved my money.
     
  5. pmolsonmus

    pmolsonmus Well-Known Member

    Here's the real question. Do you want it to sound good? Your description sounds like you have studied some voice. You also haven't stated what type of music you're trying to record acapella or w/ backing tracks. The problem w/ an inexpensive preamp (not necessarily mic) is the "wonk" created by multiple passes using that same preamp whether it is external or in an interface as suggested.

    Digitial recording is a slightly different beast than multitracking on high speed cassette or.... You got noise w/ those units but you could still make it sound pretty good. That is actually tougher now IMHO when you multitrack, and with 16 passes you need to be careful.

    I think you can still get by fairly cheap w/ an interface like the MBox or similar (the focusrite pres in that unit are pretty neutral) and it comes w/ ProTools for a few hundred dollars - try Ebay. I'd still recommend going external pre down the road w/ a decent mic. Unless you're in a good room, then a dynamic like the 57/58 is going to be the best "bang for the buck" for the time being and definitely stay away from cheap Chinese condensers unless you have a decent pre and room or the "wonk" will be worse.

    I don't think you will be satisfied w/ a mic into the soundcard on your computer. I've been a part of all-state ensembles and have directed choirs in some of the finest venues in this country in clinics with this country's best choral directors. Sound matters to me so I'm offering my opinion. Good sound is not difficult but great sound can't be done inexpensively without a great room.

    Good luck and welcome to RO

    Phil
     

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