Building a new Drum Room

Discussion in 'Acoustics (Live Room, ISO Booths)' started by Jason Morris, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    Chicago Suburbs
    Well, according to the John Sayers folks, those sections where there is no continuous sheathing are not really a weak point, because you have 5 1/2" of timber. I'm not sure what the density of 5 1/2" of pine is vs 5/8 OSB and 1 1/4" of drywall.

    In any case, my inside-out ceiling should be done soon and I can provide some insight into whether it was a success or not.
     
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  2. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    The reason i ask is because in Rods book, in the section about massing up the existing ceiling, where drywall is placed in between the bays, he cites the weak point of the assembly's isolation as the studs themselves.

    I presume it has to do with density, a continuous seal, as well as the properties of wood which make it a good conductor of sound, drums, guitars, ect are all made of wood.

    Ive never seem test data for an inside out assembly, where i have seen plenty for standard iso walls, many of which are freely available in the USG handbook.

    Im not claiming the inside out method isnt effective, i am curious as to how effective it is relative to a standard assembly. I also submit that wrapping the framing with drywall wouldn't make the assembly worse based on what i understand. How much improvement or if its necessary or not, i dont have a conjecture on until i can see some test data on the performance of the inside out ceiling. Maybe someone over at JS has some? Totally not being an A$$, im just not super well versed in this method, and i know Stuart and John, are bright minded individuals.
     
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  3. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2018
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    I AM still plugging away at this.
    I am almost done with the "isolation" portion of the build.

    I am not at a point where I need to make final decisions about how I want to build the doors.
    I am planning on a solid core door, with two layers of MDF green glued and screwed to it.

    What I am NOT sure about are seals.
    What are good seals to use around the jambs and what is a good seal to use at the floor?

    I have looked at these door sweeps:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TXGLLX2/?tag=r06fa-20

    and these seal kits:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H4PY1XN/?tag=r06fa-20

    Im wondering if those (expensive) seal kits for the bottom of the door are really the best way to go? or maybe i need to just build a threshold at the floor with good seals on it?
    I know there would be a "trip hazard" there, but I wont be bringing a lot of equipment in and out, as it's just for my own use.
    And I dont mind stepping over a threshold.
    I really just want it to work well.

    Any thoughts?
     
  4. Jason Morris

    Jason Morris Active Member

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    Mar 19, 2018
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
  5. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

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  6. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    Theres no doubt the pre-fab seal kits will work as perscribed. They are pretty pricey, so it really depends on your budget, and needs. Ive used them (door sweeps) at Normandy sound, but i can say with age (35+ years) they dont exactly work smoothly. The drop seal isnt perfect. Im sure lubrication would have help even more, but just working them loose got them moving "ok" when i was working on the doors during the re-build.

    For the door seals, on the triad wave cave, i built them as described in rods book. I did however use a single seal, rather than wonderful triple seal in rods book. This was because we didnt add mass to the solid core doors.

    For the weatherstrip we used GM type K, trunk rubber. It was available from "facca fasteners" supply company, and possibly elsewhere now. At one point it was tough to aquire. Its extremely durable, and looked brand new 5 years later, standing up well in the commercial studio.

    For the threshold i just continued the door jamb style using 1x4 (ripped to width) jamb and stops.

    I was concerned about tripping, and knicks and dents, but it proved not to be a problem on any of the 5 doors in the studio.

    Had i used a double or triple seal, then i would have used a gasketed threshold, a drop seal routed into the door bottom, and door sweep, since a triple seal on a threshold would be quite tall.

    Ive seen rod reccomend regular ribbed weatherstrip as an alternative to the magnetic weatherstrip in the book, for the third seal.

    If you end up going rods method, i can write out how to install the jambs and weatherstrip, as rod told me on RO many years back. He doesn't describe the process in the book.

    At the end of the day you just need something that creates and airtight seal, and is durable. The durability is im guessing one of the main reasons behind using trunk rubber, vs standard dept store exterior weatherstrip for the primary seal(s).
     
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  7. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

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    My concern about MDF would be its durability over time. It might be worth the slight increase in cost to use a sheets of A/C cabinet grade plywood. They go for about 35$ per sheet around here, and can look nice when stained.
     
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  8. pcrecord

    pcrecord Quality recording seeker ! Distinguished Member

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    In Canada they can be found around 300$CAD .. pricey but one less thing to doubt when looking for the max isolation ;)
    Depends on budget for sure !
     
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