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Buying my first mics to record a piano (and other stuff...)... is this mic ok?

Discussion in 'Piano' started by Stefano Guzzetti, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. Stefano Guzzetti

    Stefano Guzzetti Active Member

    Hello everyone,
    found this beautiful forum (and neverending source of knowledge) thanks to a friend of mine.
    Time has come for me to start buying mics for my home-studio set up.
    I have an acoustic piano I'd love to record in a decent way, and also a classical guitar (and I'm going to buy a mandolin too... eheheheh).
    I was thinking about a pair (in order to being able to make stereo recordings) of this AKG model which is the C4000B...
    do you think it's a good choice in general (as a starting level), and what do you think about a couple of them recording a piano (vertical, not coda). I would plug those two mic in a MOTU 896 MKIII sound board.

    links:

    AKG C4000B - C 4000 B
    MOTU 896 MKIII - MOTU.com - 896mk3 Overview

    Thanks a lot in advance
    Best Regards

    Stefano
     
  2. Boswell

    Boswell Moderator Distinguished Member

    Does "vertical" mean "upright", and why would you leave out the coda if it's there in the score?

    I don't think you would be very happy with the results from C4000Bs on a piano, especially in an untreated room. You would do better going in closer using a pair of small diaphragm condensers (SDCs) than a pair of large diaphragm condensers (LDCs) at a greater distance. In the medium price bracket, a pair of Rode NT55s is hard to beat for this type of work. I've used them quite a bit on piano, both with the cardioid capsules fitted closed paired and also with the omni capsules in a spaced-pair configuration.

    SDCs are also generally considered better for instruments like acoustic guitar and mandolin, although I have had excellent results from LDCs in M-S mode on solo acoustic guitar, but only in a studio with good acoustics.

    Here's an article on piano miking. It includes reference to using NT55s, and also there's a paragraph on miking an upright piano.
     
  3. Stefano Guzzetti

    Stefano Guzzetti Active Member

    Dear Boswell,
    thanks a lot for your answer.... now I'll go check the mentioned article.
    And yes, sorry for my poor English, I totally couldn't figure out the word, of couse for 'vertical' I meant an upright piano... ahahahah sorry again :D
    Stefano
     

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