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Buzzing power conditioner...Can it be fixed?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by pr0gr4m, Nov 17, 2008.

  1. pr0gr4m

    pr0gr4m Distinguished Member

    Feb 9, 2005
    South Florida
    Home Page:
    I've got a power conditioner and it conditions the power perfectly well. The problem I have is that it buzzes like a bee in a flower garden. This isn't 60 cycle hum...the unit is actually buzzing. I can't record with it on. It's just too loud. Not ridiculously lound, just loud enough to be annoying.

    Has anyone else experienced this?
    Can it be fixed?
    Is it something I could fix?
    It's out of warranty so sending it back for a fix would cost me money.

    If it helps any its a Furman PL Plus Series II.

    If I'm stuck, does anyone have any recommendations for power conditioners/regulators? Any advice on updating to a regulator from a conditioner?

    I'm powering my audio interface+Ai-3, 3 rack synths, 2 pre-amps and have a couple plugs left over for jacking in various devices.
  2. Greener

    Greener Guest

    Sounds like magnetic hysteresis causing something metal vibrate.

    I'm making things up.

    Have you thought about getting an electronics geek to have a poke around inside for the cost of a cheap lunch? Could be worth it.
  3. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Sep 26, 2005
    Well, the first thing I'd do is waste a couple dollars on a phone call to Furball. And especially if you are dealing with a high-voltage item such as a power conditioner. Power conditioner can mean any number of things. It can have a simple "MOV" device so as to prevent surges (beyond 300 volts). It could have a tapping toroidial transformer to automatically vary voltages. It could have batteries with a full-time sinewave generated inverter (not modified sinewave)?

    If it's making a big acoustical buzzing sound, IT'S READY TO BLOW UP! So what kind of conditioner is that? The kind that blows your equipment up! Throw it out. It's not a necessity. That kind of mistake can make you pregnant! You're talking about a desktop bedroom set up. If you want a real power conditioner go to the SIGNAL TRANSFORMER COMPANY who can sell you a "Power Isolation Transformer". That's what I use. It will handle 75 amps. Over 7000 Watts. Weighs 85 pounds in a 8 inch cubic square. Costs over $1000. Now that's power conditioning. What you have is a fan. Go to the hardware store and get yourself a surge suppressor to replace you're broken surge suppressor "power conditioner". What you might be hearing is like the break wear indicator on your car that causes your brakes to squeak. So as to let you know THEY ARE WORN OUT. That might in fact be your problem? It's letting you know, it gave its life protecting your cherished ones. It's a Dead horse. Shoot it to put it out of our misery.

    Or you could ask the company for a schematic, take out the old old volt meter & find out what failed? This should be a quiet running device. It should produce no noise. It's out of warranty? So is my Neve. Now what do I do?? I fix it. So should you. No....., I don't think I want you fixing my Neve?

    What's that button to ?
    Ms. Remy Ann David
  4. Imaginaryday

    Imaginaryday Active Member

    Mar 15, 2006
    Washington, DC
    can you post a clip?
  5. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    Dec 12, 2001
    Oberlin, OH
    Home Page:
    I am going through somewhat the same problem with an amplifier. I called the company and they told me that I may have some harmonic distortion in my AC power lines that is causing an asymmetrical wave form which is causing my toroidal transformer to react and cause the buzz.

    I too have power conditioner that is on my computers and hard drives which makes some buzzing noises especially when it is overloaded. When overloaded it sounds like what you may be experiencing. Best to contact the company and see if others have reported the same problem and what they would suggest to cure the problem.

    In the old days (and still true today) sometimes transformer laminations would come loose and buzz and you could sometimes cure that by retightening the screws that hold the transformer together or by potting the transformer in an asphalt type product to keep the laminations quiet.

    Best of luck!

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