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checking phase on drums mics

Discussion in 'Drums' started by mtzg, Sep 11, 2001.

  1. mtzg

    mtzg Guest

    I've heard repeatedly that one must check the phase of drum mics in relation to one another to find phasing problems. How does one go about doing this? I've heard things about using a "phase clicker" but I don't know what that is. Is it a procedure that one would perform which could be done with the phase meter on the console; or do you need to have a phase clicker or do you need both? I've always tried to listen for phasing by bringing one mic up at a time until I have all the mics up and see if when I bring up a fader, it creates a phased sound or a drop in volume. The drop in volume is pretty obvious to hear but that rarely happens because it's not often that two mics are completely 180° out of phase. Although, listening for phasing is much more difficult because there's always some amount of phasing happening and I'm not always sure if it's such a bad thing. Anyway, help of any kind would greatly be appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Malcolm
     
  2. audiowkstation

    audiowkstation Active Member

    Hello Malcom....How are you?

    I am going to reprint your post and snip for the purposes of conversation...Okay?

    I've heard repeatedly that one must check the phase of drum mics in relation to one another to find phasing problems. How does one go about doing this?

    First, a microphone is a miniture loudspeaker in inverse. If the element is pointing different directions...certainly phase will be affected. The source has it's own phase shifts too...so careful ear consideration should be employed for maximum quality of sound and minimum phase intervention based on positioning and microphones and acoustics. Listen for best locale.

    I've heard things about using a "phase clicker" but I don't know what that is. Is it a procedure that one would perform which could be done with the phase meter on the console; or do you need to have a phase clicker or do you need both? I've always tried to listen for phasing by bringing one mic up at a time until I have all the mics up and see if when I bring up a fader, it creates a phased sound or a drop in volume. The drop in volume is pretty obvious to hear but that rarely happens because it's not often that two mics are completely 180° out of phase. Although, listening for phasing is much more difficult because there's always some amount of phasing happening and I'm not always sure if it's such a bad thing. Anyway, help of any kind would greatly be appreciated.


    That is one hell of a run-on sentence my Friend!


    Let us look at this from another perspective.

    First. Do you have a 180 switch per channel or a vari-phase knob on your desk?

    If not....Look for the obvious signs.

    Not just level drop...but imaging differential at 12/Pan.

    My phase meter on piano can draw a complete circle. Phase is relative to bass, and bass drum foundation and to dynamic integrety of the indivigual instruments, panning and integrety, brought up in the mix. Once I had some rather mixed up calibration mic cables. Some were 180 out. I did not have them marked with orange tape 180 OUT CABLE...

    I used some and when mixing...I heard the image was not, (on a single channel) a knife blade following the panpot. I reversed until it did.

    Drums and Piano will have phase variance that can never be corrected by a switch or a pot. Careful attention to mic distance, spacing, cable and sound Q within the multichannel mix is the key.

    Email if you need more info and explanation.

    I am happy that you are considering this in your work and better results will ensue.
     

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