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[Cubase 5/Plugins] Acoustic Recording Question [To Mic Or Not To Mic]

Discussion in 'Cubase' started by Mike Miller, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Mike Miller

    Mike Miller Active Member

    Hey everyone quick question. If using Cubase 5 what plugins do you normally use to record acoustic guitar (This is my first time with acoustic). Also, would you suggest running the guitar straight from a mixing board to an audio interface, or micing it? If you suggest micing where do you normally place your condensers?
     
  2. gdoubleyou

    gdoubleyou Well-Known Member

    Plugins don't come into play until the mixing process.

    I would get a feed from the PA, and set up a couple of mics in the room.
     
  3. Mike Miller

    Mike Miller Active Member


    Sorry I worded that wrong, I meant what plugins do you use for the mixing process. Also, when you say "a couple of mics in the room" where do you suggest they go? I've heard put one mic between the 11th and 12th fret and one between the 12th and 14th fret. (Im recording this in a compression booth btw)
     
  4. Link555

    Link555 Well-Known Member

    If I mic it well....None.
     
  5. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Assuming from your question that you are not in a live performance, then how the guitar is mic'ed up will depend entirely on the room and the guitar itself. For classical nylon string guitar, one generally goes for a stereo pair in front of the guitar. Any coincident or near coincident technique is valid. Move the array closer and further away until you get the sound you want.

    Parallel to that, some classical recordings are close mic'd also or alternatively. These techniques are pretty standard for steel string acoustics too. I tend to start with small diaphragm condensers at the 12th fret and the bridge. Depending on the guitar I might change one or both mic's out for large diaphragm condensers. Another technique is a SDC at the 12th fret and a LDC over the guitar players shoulder (by their ear-not too close!) and pointing down at the body of the guitar. For a guitar that exhibits very good clarity, sometimes I will place a LDC up close loosely by the 12th fret and a LDC in omni out in the room. The room mic position is found by plugging an ear and walking around the room until you find where the guitar sounds best. Put a piece of gaffers tape on the floor to mark it and write on it how high up your ear was. It makes a difference.

    As to the signal chain itself, you gain nothing by going through a mixer if you can go straight into your interface or a specific outboard preamp and then into the interface. Peak levels should be between -12dB and -20dB. Don't worry about trying to bump the red line as this merely ruins your recording.
     
  6. Big K

    Big K Well-Known Member

    All plug of C5 or N5 are excellent. The best plug-on you have are your ears.
    I'd insert a mild vintage Compressor and get it a little of the convolution reverb and some chorus.
    The latter just a touch and only if the instrument really needs it. The C5 channel EQ is good and
    can well be used to compensate any sound deficiencies.
    Without hearing the recording I cannot say much more.
    Anything is possible... but less is often better...
     

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