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David, Matched Pairs of Mics, What and Why?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by retreading, Aug 12, 2001.

  1. retreading

    retreading Guest

    All,
    Perhaps this is a stupid question, but I'm new at this. Why is it better to have a "matched pair" of the rather than two that are not matched (of the same model, of course)? How do manufacturers select "matched pairs"? How hard is it to do after the fact (buy one then later try to match it)?

    Thanks,
    Dennis
     
  2. >All,
    Perhaps this is a stupid question, but I'm new at this. Why is it better to have a "matched pair" of the rather than two that are not matched (of the same model, of course)? How do manufacturers select "matched pairs"? How hard is it to do after the fact (buy one then later try to match it)?
    Thanks,
    Dennis <

    A matched pair is more desirable because the pair can be usie for stereo recording.

    That said, Some manufacturers select matched pairs by actually matching the frequency responses and sensitivities of two microphones within a given specification as measured in their test rooms.

    Other manufacturers merely pull two microphones from the assembly line with consecutive seriel numbers and call them matched.

    The only way you could match a pair of microphones really accurately would be to have the test gear to measure them. Other than that, get a whole bunch of the same model. Then,working with pairs, match the sensitivities, polarity invert one of the pair and feed both a simultaneous signal and sum the mic's signals. The pair that cancels the most will be the most evenly matched.
     
  3. retreading

    retreading Guest

    Thanks, Richard. I was starting to worry if I was going to get a response. You mentioned that some manufacturers, hopefully the big name, most-sought-after, ones do actually test their selections. Is that a pretty reliable generalization?

    I suppose that using the "consecutive serial number" method would largely work if their manufacturing processes were tight enough. But given what you've said, shouldn't I still expect them to test the pair?

    Thanks again,
    Dennis
     
  4. PlugHead

    PlugHead Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2001
    Dennis,
    Some manufacturers will offer matched prs. (Earthworks, CAD, Oktava, etc), but consequently, you will pay a bit extra. IMHO, Any company of worth will send the spec sheets with graphs and literature for both mics, showing how tightly matched they are. Matched pairs, esp. small diaphram, are used for extremely discerning, crtically recorded applications - chamber music, orchestra, piano, live recordings. I have matched prs.of AKG C-451e's, and CAD E-100's - not big league mics by any shot, but I use 451s often for stereo apps., but find that alot of the time, I don't want a perfect image - sometimes its way cooler to mix em up, spend time experimenting, and finding what stokes your fire. Some of the most captivating stereo recordings I've done have been with 2 completely different mics. Unless you are into critical sound recording, and thinking of spending thousands on a particular brand, I'd say don't bother - for the amount of people that'll say - hey that wouldn't have been recorded with a pr of %^$@ thru a #$%^*&%^ mic-pre, to %^&*%???? - most are listening to it as an MP-3 at 24Kbps.

    My .02 cents (Cdn worth about.0133 US) YMMV.

    Jay
    PlugHead Productions
     
  5. Juergen

    Juergen Guest

    I ordered a matched pair of the MC012's, and I am very looking forward to trying them out! They come with 3 interchangeable capsules (omni, hyper, and cardioid). I live in Paraguay, and it's a bit hard to get most mics here at a decent price. My parents just happened to be in the US for a week, so I had them sent to their hotel.

    Tonight they're coming into Asuncion (where I live).

    And I am EXCITED!

    To see my parents, too.

    :D

    Juergen
     

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