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dry vs wet?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by danielb, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. danielb

    danielb Active Member

    I was wondering what is done to a dry track before routing it to an aux? compression and eq? for what instruments are best with hard compression and whats best for soft compression?
     
  2. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    It all depends. Sometimes you don't need compression or eq. Sometimes you want to compress the effect but usually only for a specific effect..it alldepends on what you want to hear. There is no hard and fast rule. Usually you want to compress or eq the entire signal but there is no hard and fast rule. You have to know what you are trying to achieve. That is the only way to decide what will be the most effective tool to use and how.
     
  3. danielb

    danielb Active Member

    thanks i get it. what type of music would have no compression on a dry signal?? it seems like modern pop music or even modern music in general; sounds like everything is compressed.
     
  4. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Jazz, folk and classical use far less compression than rock or fusion. Usually I just compress the peaks mildly enough to just hit the spikes. On jazz I will sometimes compress the kit but again not generally as much as rock.
     
  5. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    Again, it really depends. Compression is a tool after all and tools are generally used to fix or adjust something. Not just because, you're "supposed to".

    You don't replace a clutch just because you have the tools. If it works, leave it alone.
     
  6. natural

    natural Active Member

    Compression is used to control dynamics. If your track doesn't have a lot of dynamics, then there's no need for compression.
    Ex:
    Organ- especially if it's sustained notes.
    Strings - here I mean synth or sampled strings typically used in pop music
    Bagpipes- Not too common, and although they're loud as hell, you probably won't need to compress them.
    That should give you the general idea.
     
  7. danielb

    danielb Active Member

    thanks.i understand. but doesnt it sound like that most pop and modern rock type of songs are all compressed...i still like to compress a dry track softly and compress the wet track differently. i guess as a student in the "game". im just wondering what is other mixing techniques out there besides me doing ny compression on all my tracks?? thanks for all your input i appreciate it.
     
  8. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Most modern pop and rock hurts my ears. And that has nothing to do with the quality of the songs. It hurts my ears because there are no dynamics and all life is crushed from it.
     

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