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Dynamic or Condenser?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Guitarfreak, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    I don't have a professional recording space, so my vocals come out with a lot of background noise. I have an Audix i5 dynamic which is meant to mic guitar cabs so the amount of gain I have to put on in post-production just to hear it is ridic, this also boosts all background noise.

    Do condenser mics pick up background noise just as easily? I have looked into this one... http://www.guitarcenter.com/Sterling-Audio-ST55-Large-Diaphragm-FET-Condenser-Microphone-103641361-i1165169.gc ...and I'm pretty sure I will buy it soon. Its sound quality is great for my budget but noise is my only concern.
     
  2. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Background noise, or interference?

    Interference can only be fixed with quality gear and cables.

    Background noise will be picked up MORE by a condenser.
     
  3. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Background noise will be picked up MORE by a condenser.

    That's what I thought, 200 for a decent mic and I would still have to spend hours in post-production to get a clean signal v_v

    Any tips?
     
  4. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Continue with the dynamic for a start.

    Check your gain structure - do you really need so much gain?
     
  5. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Check your gain structure - do you really need so much gain?

    Yes lol, I don't have any preamps, so it's a bare signal going into logic Pro, and I need to put about 30 dB of gain just to get a strong enough signal to mix. Seriously, I mean it's meant for cranked cabs and I don't have the strongest of voices.
     
  6. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    "I don't have any preamps"

    Are you plugging this into an onboard soundcard?
    (Then into Logic)

    If no: what the hell are you doing?
    If yes: get a preamp. There's a reason you need these things and if I'm beginning to think you're still unclear on the difference between interference (static, buzzing, hissing) and background noise (AC, passing traffic, loud TVs next door).
     
  7. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Well of course there is a soundcard, in my computer, but nothing between the mic and my iMac I mean.

    I can't really afford a nice tube preamp, and why would I buy a cheap digital one when Logic can do the same thing?

    And yes I may be thinking of interference, sounds like an airplane engine under my vocals.
     
  8. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    OK...

    Analog:
    (Mic) -> (Preamp) -> (ADC)
    It's now digital (after the Analog to Digital Converter) and the signal is now stuck that way.

    The soundcard in the mac adds noise, specifically a massive amount of it. The preamp is a low-noise device that boosts the signal by (in some cases) up to 70dB without adding (too much) static etc.
    Then when the signal gets to the ADC, it's a lot higher in voltage (effectively) and while your ADC still adds noise, the signal is stronger allowing you to use less gain and thus having less static.

    People will tell you to get an external USB soundcard that lets you plug in mics etc. and that's fine and well.
    Tube preamps are in fact $*^t quality until you spend a stupid amount on them, far more than I bet you're prepared to. Same goes with condensers. A $200 condenser is not a great investment, and 90% (if not more) of the people here would rather have an SM58 than a cheap condenser. SM58s cost $100, btw.

    So, stop amplifying your noise in Logic, stop wasting hours on edits (btw - get a noise gate, tweak the paramters a little - it probably does what you do but will do the entire signal in ohh, 15 minutes including time spent adjusting it), stop being below me on the gear ladder (and I'm on the 2nd bottom rung) and get a preamp.
     
  9. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    about the SM58, I heard it today in comparison to the previously mentioned condenser and wow, I'm not going to get the 58 lol. A cheap condenser is better than any dynamic for studio vocals.

    Ok, your argument is good, what preamp would you recommend?
     
  10. jg49

    jg49 Well-Known Member

    Audix i5 Applications

    Live stage, studio
    Snare, toms, percussion
    Guitar cabs, electric instruments
    Brass, flute, woodwinds
    Acoustic instruments
    Vocals, speech

    Please note the manufacturer suggests this mic can be used as a vocal mic. Just because it can handle high SPL levels like guitar cabs, so can the SM57, does not mean that it will not transmit vocal level input well. I am not commenting on the sonic signature, whether you like the "sound" of this mic or not simply that this mic should function well enough with a preamp for your intended use.

    Your usage requires a preamp, certainly a low cost digital one will vastly improve your sound, VASTLY.

    The Sterling mic you are thinking about requires phantom power I believe and your computer can not supply that. Nearly any preamp you might buy should.

    The $200.00 would be much better spent on a preamp/inteface for example Presonus Firebox for $50.00 more than the Sterling. Nearly all these come with bundled software that might be a plus.
     
  11. iamfrobs

    iamfrobs Guest

    haha. lol. omgzz

    AB your new Nady Condenser with a BCM705
    lol. I bet that nady sounds almost as good.

    Use your freakin' ears, don't worry about the gear.
    Stop polluting my internet.
     
  12. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    haha. lol. omgzz

    AB your new Nady Condenser with a BCM705
    lol. I bet that nady sounds almost as good.

    Use your freakin' ears, don't worry about the gear.
    Stop polluting my internet.


    ...what?
     
  13. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    your whole post doesn't make sense. BTW I meant cheap like decent, not cheap like plastic.
     
  14. iamfrobs

    iamfrobs Guest

    Don't make broad sweeping statements, it's tomfoolery.

    Bound to get a foolish answer.
     
  15. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Don't make broad sweeping statements, it's tomfoolery.

    Fair enough, I still think 250 is too much for a basic preamp.
     
  16. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

    I'm afraid you probably dont have enough experience at this to make a statement like that and have anyone take you seriously.

    An SM58 eats up and seriously pukes the guts out of most $200 condensers. That Sterling is an okay mic, but this isnt your problem. You put that into your card without an interface or a preamp and if you thought the i5 made a lot of noise!

    Like has been said....you'll need phantom power for a condenser.

    You need a preamp. Or an interface with preamps built in.
     
  17. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Don't make broad sweeping statements, it's tomfoolery.

    Fair enough, I still think 250 is too much for a basic preamp.
     
  18. iamfrobs

    iamfrobs Guest

    If that is too much, I would recommend a different hobby.

    The gear addiction will hit you worse than any other drug buddy.

    For a cheap preamp/converter, get a firebox.
     
  19. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    sorry for double post.
     
  20. jg49

    jg49 Well-Known Member

    Oh but I read where condenser mics are BETTER.

    Certainly when recording through a computers sound card the rich tonal quality of a condenser mic is going to make ALL the difference.

    BTW A/B is testing micA against micB in side by side recording of the same input.

    Which by the way most of the people responding have done numerous times.
     

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