EFF Challenges Clear Channel Recording Patent

Discussion in 'Live Sound' started by recordista, Feb 14, 2006.

  1. recordista

    recordista Active Member

    Sep 7, 2001
    Silver City, NM
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    Electronic Frontier Foundation Media Release

    For Immediate Release: Tuesday, February 14, 2006


    Jason Schultz
    Staff Attorney
    Electronic Frontier Foundation
    +1 415 436-9333 x112

    Theodore C. McCullough
    Lemaire Patent Law Firm
    +1 952 278-3508

    EFF Challenges Clear Channel Recording Patent

    Illegitimate Patent Locks In Artists and Threatens Innovators

    San Francisco - The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed a challenge Monday to an illegitimate patent from Clear Channel Communications. The patent -- for a system and method of creating digital recordings of live performances -- locks musical acts into using Clear Channel technology and blocks innovations by others.

    Clear Channel claims that its patent creates a monopoly on all-in-one technologies that produce post-concert live recordings on digital media and has threatened to sue anyone who makes such recordings with a different system. This has forced bands like the Pixies into using Clear Channel's proprietary technology, and it hurts investment and innovation in new systems developed by other companies.

    "Clear Channel shouldn't be able to intimidate artists with bogus intellectual property," said EFF Staff Attorney Jason Schultz. "We hope the Patent Office will take a hard look at Clear Channel's patent and agree that it should be revoked."

    The request for reexamination filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office shows that a company named Telex had in fact developed similar technology more than a year before Clear Channel filed its patent request. EFF, in conjunction with Theodore C. McCullough of the Lemaire Patent Law Firm and with the help of students at the Glushko-Samuelson Intellectual Property Clinic at American University's Washington College of Law, wants the patent office to revoke the patent based on this and other extensive evidence.

    "The patent system serves an important public purpose in our economy," said Schultz. "Keeping illegitimate patents out of that system helps up-and-coming artists and entrepreneurs succeed for all of us."

    The Clear Channel patent challenge is part of EFF's Patent Busting Project, aimed at combating the chilling effects bad patents have on public and consumer interests. Illegitimate patents currently in effect could prevent you from building a hobbyist website or even streaming a wedding video to your friends. The Patent Busting Project seeks to document the threats and fight back by filing requests for reexamination against the worst offenders.

    For the full reexamination request:

    For more on the evidence against Clear Channel:

    For this release:

    About EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation is the leading civil liberties organization working to protect rights in the digital world. Founded in 1990, EFF actively encourages and challenges industry and government to support free expression and privacy online. EFF is a member-supported organization and maintains one of the most linked-to websites in the world at http://www.eff.org/


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