examples of mixes before the mastering stage

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by Adore, Oct 9, 2005.

  1. Adore

    Adore Guest

    Hi there,

    I would like to have a listen at good mixes before the mastering stage mainly regarding pop or rock music.

    My goal is to get some examples to compare my mixes with, before the mastering stage.

    Any place where I can get these ?
     
  2. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    Good mixes should be just that good mixes they should sound OK but there should be no overall compression or equalization added to them so they may sound a bit flat. We keep some examples to play for potential clients to show them what their mixes should sound like. The mix sound good it is just that they don't sound like they were mastered which is what we are trying to show to the potential clients.

    Today a lot of studio engineers or people doing their own mixing strap a compressor across the 2 channel mix to make it sound louder but once the compression is on it is hard to take it off. My best suggestion would be to listen to some acoustical music played live with no amplification and that is what you are trying to get your mixes to sound like. Hope this helps
     
  3. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    I agree with Thomas. The recordings I've made over the past 35 years have compression and/or limiting and reverb, selectively added to individual instruments and vocalists, not across my stereo mix bus. Then in the postproduction mastering process, some overall equalization and more compression and/or limiting can be added to pump it up! First and foremost, your performers talent and you're skills have to be in place. I hate trying to mix with a stereo compressor across my mix bus (unless I'm doing talking head news for television). Once, I went into the University of Maryland Baltimore County Studios to mix a recording for a good friend. The studio manager, a Ph.D. who will remain nameless, couldn't understand why I wanted him to unplug his terrible digital limiter! This guy had also installed a Crest PA board instead of an actual recording console like an old used MCI 400 series console (a terrible board that really didn't sound good but was a functional real recording console for students) because he felt "it had better specifications"! Right! I have made wonderful recordings on broken, $300, 20-year-old Peavey PA boards! My best advice to you..... Don't ever go there!
     
  4. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    I agree with Thomas. The recordings I've made over the past 35 years have compression and/or limiting and reverb, selectively added to individual instruments and vocalists, not across my stereo mix bus. Then in the postproduction mastering process, some overall equalization and more compression and/or limiting can be added to pump it up! First and foremost, your performers talent and you're skills have to be in place. I hate trying to mix with a stereo compressor across my mix bus (unless I'm doing talking head news for television). Once, I went into the University of Maryland Baltimore County Studios to mix a recording for a good friend. The studio manager, a Ph.D. who will remain nameless, couldn't understand why I wanted him to unplug his terrible digital limiter! This guy had also installed a Crest PA board instead of an actual recording console like an old used MCI 400 series console (a terrible board that really didn't sound good but was a functional real recording console for students) because he felt "it had better specifications"! Right! I have made wonderful recordings on broken, $300, 20-year-old Peavey PA boards! My best advice to you..... Don't ever go there!
     
  5. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Oooops! I really hate to repeat myself!
     

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