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Firewire 800

Discussion in 'Converters & Interfaces' started by tundrkys, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. tundrkys

    tundrkys Guest

    I'm guessing that is 800mbps? the old standard was 500mbps??
    I've got a laptop, my only complaint is that it doesn't have firewire. I've seen PCMCIA adapters with firewire ports. I think they were 500mbps.

    Do they make 800mbps?? Is 500mbps fast enough to track 8 stereo channels??
  2. Firewire 800 transfers at 800 Mbps.
    Firewire 400 (the old standard) transfers at 400 Mbps.
    USB 2.0 transfers at 450 Mbps.

    According to the folks over at RME (i've been researching the FireFace 800 recently). You can easily track 8 stereo channels with FW400 - it's only if you want to link more than one FireFace together that you'd want FW800 (technically, you can record 35 tracks onto 28 channels with ONE fireface...nevermind if you were to link 2 or 3 of'em) - and that's on one FW400 connection....

    LaCie makes a Cardbus adapter with 2 Firewire 800 ports and 1 FW400 port on it for about $80 or so.
  3. MrPhil

    MrPhil Guest

    Do you know what difference firewire contra pci does to latency and performance?
  4. from what I understand - because the RME stuff all has onboard DSP, your processor doesn't really come into play as far as how many tracks you can record at one time...so it should be extremely low latency. as far as the difference between that and PCI, i couldn't tell ya offhand...
  5. tundrkys

    tundrkys Guest

    LaCie Cardbus, will that fit into a PCMCIA slot???

    You mean to tell me USB 2.0 (which I have two of already on my laptop) will allow me to record 8 stereo tracks at one time????
  6. David French

    David French Distinguished Member

    Jun 19, 2002

    24 bit * 96,000 samples/sec. = 2,304,000 bps.

    2,304,000 bps / 1024 = 2250 Kbps

    2,250 Kbps / 1024 = 2.2 Mbps

    2.2 Mbps * 16 channels = 35.2 Mbps

    Keep in mind that that 480 Mbps spec is the peak transfer rate, not the sustained rate. Sustained rates are usually about 3/4ths of the peak rate.

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