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Fixing Acoustic Foam Tiles

Discussion in 'Room Acoustics / Studio Design' started by Sean G, Jul 27, 2015.

  1. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

    I recently replaced the acoustic treatment with some new acoustic tiles in my home soundroom.
    These are strategically placed such as first points of reflection, etc also four centred on the main oposing wall followed by a line either side along the centre at evenly spaced intervals, also some corner bass traps.
    While they look great, I find that due to not wanting a permanent fix I went for the option of using an adhesive velcro option so not to damage the paint on my 50 year old plaster board (ie drywall) walls.
    Each tile is around 500mm x 500mm (30 inches x 30 inches in old world terms) and I am using approx 4 to 6 inch strips on all 4 opposing sides of the rear of each tile.
    This has led to an ever constant battle with gravity which eventually wins in the end.
    While the adhesive velco loves the drywall (although I'm most likely going to need a hairdryer to softten the adhesive first should I ever have to remove it so not to damage the paint surface of the wall), the acoustic foam tiles not so much due to the open cell foam composition....
    Is there a solution anyone could recommend that would be a semi-permanent fix to this rather trivial yet annoying first-world-problem which sees me having to pick up and re-attach a couple of tiles every time I enter my sound room?
    Any advice would be much appreciated.

    -Sean.
     
  2. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    staple cardboard to the wall and then glue the foam to the cardboard. when you want to take down the foam just pull the cardboard off.
     
    i80mediagroup and Brien Holcombe like this.
  3. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

    Thats not a bad idea Kurt...
    Thanks for the reply.
    -Sometimes the answer is staring you in the right face but you need a freash pair of eyes to see it.

    Cheers,
    Sean.
     
  4. i80mediagroup

    i80mediagroup Member

    I've done exactly that. It works out pretty well. Every couple months things will get a bit loose on the back of the foam and I'll have to add more glue.
     
  5. Kurt Foster

    Kurt Foster Distinguished Member

    Scotch 705 spray adhesive works. it will never come off! lol ....
     
  6. Brien Holcombe

    Brien Holcombe Well-Known Member

    That....and a piece of bardboard on the foam with a french cleat to support it all.

    http://buildthisroom.com/french-cleat/
     
  7. Brien Holcombe

    Brien Holcombe Well-Known Member

    Oh...and the additional air space will increase the frequencies that the absorber will perform at. Increase meaning going lower in the domain.
     
  8. Sean G

    Sean G Well-Known Member

    Well I took Kurts' advice and stapled cardboard slightly smaller than the tile to the wall and then used an adhesive spray (its called 777 here in Oz) to adhere the tiles to the cardboard.
    Its such a relief to not have to walk into the soundroom and not have to pick up one or two tiles from the floor before starting anything else.

    Thanks to all for the advice, now I can spend my energy on the creative side of things.
     

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