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Good buy?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Christakis, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. Christakis

    Christakis Guest

    Hey yall,
    I'm new to recording but not to creating or playing music. I have a friend who owns an mbox and loves it. As a musician starting off with absolutely no home recording equipment save a screaming fast computer, what do you make of a deal like this:


    There are, obviously, many other deals and products out there. So, the reason why I inquire about this item is just to get an idea or basis for judgment of this kind of equipment. Also, I am not looking for anything particularly professional grade because I despise overproduced music and stuff that is manufactured to sound "perfect." I will most likely be recording instruments live to try and get the most organic sound out of a recording session (or layers if I'm recording one track at a time).

    Sorry, I a lot of questions. No need to answer any at all, just curious and completely green to all this.

  2. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Sep 26, 2005
    It doesn't matter if you have a screaming fast computer.

    It does matter if your computer is not one of the recommended units for Digidesign ProTools. They have extremely specific requirements that must be adhered to. If not, it ain't gunna' work at all. So it really doesn't matter what kind of computer you have as long as it is a recommended computer for Digidesign ProTools 7.4. You'll have to go to their web site and find out if your computer qualifies.

    So, no. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this. The microphones they're throwing in are not worth the incentive. Worthless crap.

    There are numerous other audio interfaces that offer more input capabilities & good software. Most all other systems have fairly universal minimum requirements and will work with most any computers.

    The only reason you would want that system is because you want to work in ProTools but again, your computer must meet their specifications and not your specifications.

    Oh boy oh boy oh boy!
    Ms. Remy Ann David
  3. natural

    natural Active Member

    Jul 21, 2006

    START HERE to see if your computer is on the list
  4. Christakis

    Christakis Guest

    So, is there an industry standard for beginners like me?
  5. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Distinguished Member

    Dec 11, 2007
    Scotland, UK
    Cubase in some form maybe. Kristal and Reaper might be worth looking into, Kristal being free and Reaper being a demo but quite cheap. Cubase comes with a lot of interfaces.

    All I'm going to do is coax some information (we have ways of making you talk) which other people will work on, but...

    What is it for?
    OK, you said recording live instruments. Guitar? Drums? Screamo death metal vocalists? Classical harp? Kazoos?
    This decides mics/etc. A drumkit involves more mics and will likely need an interface with more connections. Guitar can be done using 1 single preamp on say, a Lexicon desktop interface.

    Where are you recording?
    Anywhere that you need to such as a hall, or do you have a room in your house/someones house that you can use?
    This decides on acoustic treatment and portability of gear. Obviously, dragging your computer somewhere isn't practical and that would rule out PCI cards.

    What's the budget?
    Most important really. $100 ain't gonna get you anything except a few cables and a mic/stand.

    Also, the screaming fast computer helps a bit. More RAM = more plugins/processing for your audio software and more CPU speed = faster mixdowns (given a fast hard drive).

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