Guitar effects setup...

Discussion in 'Mixing & Editing' started by zperaldrummerz, Jun 18, 2006.

  1. Ok, so my guitarist is absolutely in love with the distortion he gets out of his small 15 watt fender amp. so heres the problem, how to work the fender amp distortion into his pedal board so that the sound could be router either to the fender amp and then through the rest of his effects, or around the fender amp and straight to his effects pedals. i don't think this matters but he uses a marshall valvestate half-stack
  2. twon

    twon Guest

    does he still like the distortion from this amp if he uses its line out? if he does, you could get a loop box (switches a loop in and out of the chain) and put it in the loop of that. eg.

    little amp (in then line out)
    --------- | -------- /
    guitar>Loop Box>other distortions, rest of pedalboard>amp

    something like that should work

  3. moonbaby

    moonbaby Mmmmmm Moderator

    Feb 23, 2005
    I suspect that the "15-watt Fender amp" is either a "Pro Jr." or a "Blues Jr", st least those are the (2) 15-watters that Fender makes that have a decent OD to them. Certainly better than the Valvestates' distortion. I know that on at least the "Pro Jr"s chassis there is NO line output, even if you wanted to use that. But that's OK, because line outs on any amp usually sound like crap anyway. You need to tap the sound at the speaker output to get the "real" tone from the tubes. You do this by getting a quality DI box like a Radial, or a dedicated power attenuator like a THD Hotplate. You drive that little Fender's speaker output (it's on the underside of the chassis-real awkward) into a box designed for speaker levels, THEN you take the output of that into the rest of your rig, terminating into the Valvestate. I have used a Pro Jr like that many times, in fact that's my favorite way (through a Hotplate). I avoid using the internal speaker at all times because the positioning of it right up by all the tubes tends to vibrate them to the point of being microphonic and super-noisey. Rock on, baby!

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