Guitar mixing

Discussion in 'Tracking / Mixing / Editing' started by psimard, Nov 17, 2012.

  1. psimard

    psimard Active Member

    I just started mixing this guitar intro for a song I'm working on. I recorded this on my Presonus Firepod, with a Neumann TLM 103 on the guitar itself, and a Blue Spark mic on the amp in another room. I'm pretty new to mixing and I don't really know where to go from here, I'd love to get some pointers on how to make it sound better, richer, and clearer. Any thoughts/tips are greatly appreciated.

    here's the soundcloud link: guitar intro by patricksimard on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free

    Thanks!
     
  2. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    I think whatever you did here, was nice, pleasant, soothing and rather ethereal. You've done everything well. Tips and thoughts? Other than, this wasn't exactly a song, I really don't have anything to add? It's mood doodling. Nice to relax with I guess? What is your music and recording supposed to say? Where are you going with this? Better richer and clearer? Better, richer and clearer, what? Its already rich and clear, fat, warm. You sure don't want a Chinese fire drill do you? So I think is quite nice. You've got the right equipment and you used it well. If you want warmer and fatter, then you'll probably want to look into a ribbon microphone or two? They go well with condenser microphones because they are neither in phase nor out of phase but are more like 90°-270° different. So any color filtering cancellation will be completely different than that of dynamic or other condenser microphones. Otherwise I really don't think it's necessary because your stuff already sounds quite nice. Clean, quiet, no extraneous noises, no obnoxious dynamics, all good. Just keep doing what you're doing. You really don't need any other equipment. Not that you can't ingratiate yourself with something new? That's always fun to do. And then ya feel better about yourself and what you're doing.

    It's all good
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  3. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    When it comes to recording any acoustic instrument, Mic position is everything. As Remy mentioned, the general go-to mic for acoustic instruments are condensers, (or ribbons for those that can afford them) an LD will likely grab more warmth and low end while an SD will generally get you more presence BUT this relies entirely on the positioning of the mic(s).

    If you are recording a piece where the acoustic instrument is the main focus, you may want to experiment with different multi-mic arrays: X-Y, ORTF and even M-S, these stereo arrays will provide you with a built in depth that can require less artificial processing that can sometimes result in lack of definition.

    Is there anyway you can provide a dry sample of the same guitar track without the processing? It might help us to hear what the track sounded like naturally and allow for more in depth critique.

    I would suggest that you do some research on mic techniques, and experiment a bit with these various applications.
     
  4. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    One of the fun things about trying to record acoustic guitar with microphones is that the microphones have to be focused almost like a camera. Where you can't necessarily see what you're doing? Anyone could you expect if you gave Helen Keller a camera and asked her to take your families photo? Right. So it's a huge trial and error process to find that proper focal point with whatever microphone you have on hand to use. Hey, I like acoustic guitars with 57/58's as the only microphones on them. They sound great... once ya get them focused. And that's why you have speakers. And that's why God gave you ears. Otherwise it wouldn't make a good god damn would it? Right. No... but seriously though... I'm serious. I just say whatever the little voices in my head tell me to say.

    You want what for Christmas?
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     

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