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Guitar Recording Tricks

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by mad_ackers, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. mad_ackers

    mad_ackers Active Member

    Here is the situation...

    I have recorded a lead guitar part and want to make it sound stereo WITHOUT recording another track to pair with it and then panning.

    Does anyone have any tips on how to make a single guitar track sound like multiple panned guitar track?

    Thanks for any advice, i know it is a bizarre request!!
     
  2. Jeemy

    Jeemy Well-Known Member

    Just dupe it, and put the other one forward by 0.3s or so. Maybe 0.3ms, I can't remember. Its pretty obvious in the DAW, just nudge it as little as you can. You can do one at 0.3 and one at 0.6 and pan them left and right. Just pull it in by ear so it doesn't phase. But even the phasing sound is kinda endemic on modern metal guitar parts.
     
  3. mad_ackers

    mad_ackers Active Member

    Wik'd, thanks!
     
  4. liveit777

    liveit777 Active Member

    Just wondering.... Is ther a certain reason you don't want another track? I don't know why I wanted to know this.. I guess I was just curious!
     
  5. Guitarfreak

    Guitarfreak Well-Known Member

    Try duping and utilizing different processing. For instance, send the A through something and send the B through something else that sounds different, and maybe do a C version as well. Blend them all to taste. Pan them out and put effects on one and not the others. Completely saturate B with reverb, put a phaser on C and leave A dry etcetc. Just some ideas. I usually don't like doing stuff like this, but when I'm forced to use a single track and make do with just that, tricks like this come in handy.
     
  6. Jaxon13

    Jaxon13 Active Member

    There's a FREE VST plug-in for ADT (Automatic Double Tracking) which (sort of) simulates the Beatles ADT sound. Here's a link to it: [DLMURL="link removed vacuumsound ADT - Virtual Effect[/DLMURL]

    Gives a nice stereo effect to a mono voice track with various tweaks to adjust the width of the pan and amount of delay, etc., so might work well on a guitar track too?

    (Apologies if links are verboten...please let me know. :smile: The download is free and works nicely, in my humble, not-affiliated-with-the-company opinion....)

    --Jaxon
     
  7. leopoldolopes

    leopoldolopes Active Member

    All options you have here are very good... delays, reverb, and mixing levels should be used on duplicated guitar tracks to give that stereo feeling... and as jeemy said you may put the other one forward by 0.3s or so...
     
  8. JohnTodd

    JohnTodd Well-Known Member

    I know in Cubase you can take a mono recording and put it onto a stereo track, then use your stereo FX on it. A stereo delay (echo) of 28ms panned hard left and right will give you a tight doubling, super wide stereo effect.
     
  9. song4gabriel

    song4gabriel Active Member

    wow...never tried that. thanks JT
     
  10. JohnTodd

    JohnTodd Well-Known Member

    No problem! Play with the delay time a little to your taste.
     
  11. rocksure

    rocksure Active Member

    A trick I use a far bit is this:
    a) The main track up the center with whatever effects you want on it ( if any).
    b) Make two clones of that track. Pan one left and one right.......at maybe 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock
    c) One one of the clones put a delay with no feedback,100 % mix at a very small delay time like 7-11 millisecs. Add a pich shift of round -8 ( parts of not whole semi tones). Maybe then add a bit of an aux send delay and reverb as well, with longer times panned diferrently
    d) On the other clone put a delay with no feedback,100 % mix at a very small delay time like 18-22 millisecs. Add a pich shift of round +8 ( parts of not whole semi tones). Then add a bit of an aux send delay and reverb as well, with longer times panned diferrently from the first clone.
    e) Because the two clones are on separate tracks you can pull up their faders to suit your taste. The more you pull them up the more chorused it will sound. Vary the delay amounts if needs be till you get just the sound you want. You will have a nice stereo, larger than life lead sound if you do it well.
     
  12. song4gabriel

    song4gabriel Active Member

    for b and c are you using the effects as inserts or sends?

    thanks
     
  13. rocksure

    rocksure Active Member

    The short delays and pitch shifting are done as inserts with 100% wet sound. The other effects like long delays and reverb are done with effects sends ( auxs or buses) and dialled in as much as required.
     

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