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Home Studio Speaker set-up

Discussion in 'Recording' started by Solitube, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. Solitube

    Solitube Member

    Aug 3, 2012
    Greetings everyone !! I'm (of course) new here but have experimented in home recordings since '05.
    I have a small DAW in a spare bedroom. Im PC and run Sonar 5 (yeah, thats old), but its mostly for song creation and being able to play along with.
    I've just recently retired from the "bar" scene as a guitarist, and have 4 PA speakers.
    2) JBL JRX125
    2)Behringer Eurolive B1800X Pro

    Im moving my studio in a dining room we never use so I'll have lots of room.
    So, I was wondering since the PA stuff will fit in the room with no problem, and I'm thinking about hooking up these 4 cabinets to play music through from my studio. Not for recording, but for listening.
    I have a pair of really nice Wharfedale monitors I use for song creation.
    The larger PA speakers would be for just listening to music from my iTunes and CDs and completed songs in Sonar.

    My current DAW consists of:
    PC w/Sonar 5 (and some other studio instruments on board)
    Presonus FirePod (8 inputs)
    Presonus HP4
    Alesis DM5
    ADA MP-2
    Roland Juno-D Keyboard
    Roland VG-88 w/GK-2
    as mentioned a pair of Wharfedale and a pair of Edirol MA-100
    M-Audio midi interface
    Furman RackRider
    I'm using Fire-Wire connection.

    I'm thinking I'm going to need some power to the PA speakers and possibly a cross-over unit ???

    Any suggestions would be appreciated !!! (Great place you have here !!)smoke
  2. Boswell

    Boswell Distinguished Moderator Resource Member

    Apr 19, 2006
    Home Page:
    While you could go out and buy a power amp to drive any or all of those PA speakers, you have to consider whether that is the right thing to do. As a general rule, PA speakers make a really poor domestic listening setup, as they are simply not designed for that application.

    My advice would be that if you really want just a listening room, get a versatile domestic hi-fi system you can plug your iPod or whatever into and also run a stereo pair of line-level signals to it from your studio. There's no shame in having a decent hi-fi system in one part of the house and also having a semi-pro studio in another part.

    If, on the other hand, you want this listening area to be part of your studio operations such as using it as a mixing room, you may want to consider studio monitor speakers rather than hi-fi speakers. That would mean that they would not be so comfortable for pleasure listening, but they would be better for using to make critical mix and balance decisions. Take into account the need to add acoustic treatment to the room.

    Either way, leave the PA speakers out of it.

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