How Do You Promote Your Mastering Services/Businesses?

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by hunter07, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. hunter07

    hunter07 Active Member

    Nov 19, 2011
    I know a lot of you guys are seasoned veterans/professionals so you probably just have a very healthy client list and get by on that and word of mouth but I'm new and just starting up so I was wondering how you would recommend a newbie get the word out about their services/business?

    Thanks for the help in advance!
  2. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Distinguished Member

    Jul 18, 2004
    Chicago area, IL, USA
    Home Page:
    Helping out on forums never hurts.

    And I mean helping out as opposed to so many "drive-by" posters who stop in and "sell" themselves and you basically never hear from them again.

    Certain types of add-werdz (lack of a better term, trying NOT to attract certain search engines) you'd THINK would help, but this really isn't the type of industry. I had them for a time -- Racked up tens of thousands in legal bills getting websites that "stole" my site to take them down. Which still happens somewhat frequently - but wow, it was one after another after another when I was using those damn add-werdz things... And never - Not once - did someone ever say "I found you through the add-werdz thing" - ever.

    Of course, these days, your website is your world-wide business card. Make it a good one (but as mentioned, make it YOURS and not a hijacked version of someone else's - not that I was suggesting you'd do such a thing - I'm just sayin').**

    And keep in mind that even with a fairly stable collection of "regulars" (I had probably a few dozen "reliable" clients when I first started MASSIVE after splitting up from the JEM complex), it can take years - y-e-a-r-s - before you have a truly decent bunch of business. But that's just like any other business - Don't expect to be in the black for 4-5 years. And that's assuming you've "got the goods" to begin with.

    And these days, if you're actually starting from scratch, you really need to stand out above the rather gigantic crowd -- That's where that web site is going to come in handy. People like visual stuff. It doesn't have to be huge and awesome, it has to be neat and professional. People like pictures - They want to see what they're buying (attended or not, new clients often tell me that the photos were a big reason why they chose to come here over someplace else). If you're not handy with a camera, find someone who is. Maybe someone in a band that you can barter with. A reasonably applicable gear list (again, people like to know what they're dealing with - and don't have a big list of microphones on a mastering site).

    And those horrible "free hosting" sites don't count. That's a sure-fire way to turn potential clients off in a hurry. Pro hosting packages can be had for under $10 a month and web sites aren't expensive to produce (the investment of time is by far the biggest investment there).

    Push to the clientele you want -- I could probably come up with 100 "mastering" places that are kids in a bedroom with a bunch of cracked plugins -- $200 monitors / $8,000 plugin bundles -- and lemme tell you something - The public isn't that stupid.

    I'm sorry - Some of the public is that stupid. And those guys are "mastering" tracks for those guys. For five bucks a track, probably a few tracks a week (because there are 99 other "mastering" places just like them).

    I don't mean to sound so jaded... This just isn't the type of thing I'd suggest doing in this climate. Personally, I feel lucky as hell that I "went solo" when I did - because I sure wouldn't do it now (again, without a substantial number of regular clients to draw from). The SNR of the whole industry is out of whack at the moment.
  3. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    Dec 12, 2001
    Oberlin, OH
    Home Page:
    Word of mouth seems to work the best for us. We have tried putting up video on cable, newspapers, magazines, radio, and direct mail. NADA/Nothing. We have what I consider to be a GREAT website with a gear list, pictures and some info about the company. Nothing too flashy and we don't promise the moon with a fence around it. Seems to work well. There are flasher websites around and I know people who get lots of clients advertising their wares on the internet. The problem today is there are just too many places offering "mastering" and not enough people that seem to need their services. Best of luck!

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