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How do you take the edge off?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by ckevperry, Dec 5, 2001.

  1. ckevperry

    ckevperry Active Member

    Hey , I'm not too proud to ask. We're all learning!

    I love my mixes on PT. I use lucid converters, Great River preamps, a couple kinds of compressors on the way in. Clarity and imaging are phenomenal. The bottom end stays rock solid.

    But oh how I miss tape for drums. (And no I don't really want to get into running to tape first for my kind of operation.) Using "smear" analog tools helps some. A 1073 goes a long way on kick and snare for me.

    So how do you guys dirty up drums? Is that fatso unit really all that?
     
  2. SoFine

    SoFine Guest

    I have used Sans Amp to add warmth to drums (and vocals) and from what I've read on other forums (DUC - Digidesign), it seems to be quite popular.

    Simon :)
     
  3. It's kinda the opposite of what one might think: trim those transients. I've found that if you select and reduce gain on the drum transients then normalise back to that level, your drums get big. Sure, they don't have quite the impact, but the sound is huge. ;)
     
  4. Insasmuch as I've finally accepted the inevitability of a whole new sonic paradigm for all us old school types who grew up with names like "API", "Neve", "Ampex", "Studer", etc., e.g. letting go of the "Analog Ideal", the single greatest factor in finally convincing me to take the PT Plunge some four years ago was the DuY plug ing known as DaD Tape on drums, bass, guitars, basically, everything. The DaD Valve is pretty terrific on most stuff as well, though it can get a tad tubby.

    The McDSP Analog Channel 2 is also quite a respectable bit of Analog Tape emulation, though there are so many user variables that it often ends up doing more harm than good. But the DSP efficiency is undeniable, so just be careful.
     
  5. bassmac

    bassmac Guest

    Originally posted by captain_analog:
    It's kinda the opposite of what one might think: trim those transients. I've found that if you select and reduce gain on the drum transients then normalise back to that level, your drums get big. Sure, they don't have quite the impact, but the sound is huge. ;)

    I'd like to try this out. Do you do this to all your drum tracks? And what kind of reduction and normalize numbers are you using?

    Thanks!
     
  6. bassmac

    bassmac Guest

    BTW: The FATSO does do a good job of taking off that nasty digital edge.
     

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