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How important is it? please help :)

Discussion in 'Studio Lounge' started by lokn45, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. lokn45

    lokn45 Guest

    Hello, I was reading through some of these posts and was pleased to find responses from actual engineers and producers and such (aka, people with valued opinions who actually know what they're talking about :wink: )
    my question is this: i'm currently enrolled as a music major at a community college (i will end up with an associates in music from here), after finding the school I previously attended for music and sound recording wasnt right for me. my next step, as it is right now, is to transfer to Suffolk University in Boston. the only problem with this, is that they dont have a straight out music major, or audio engineering in any form. i would be majoring, most likely, in media studies. they also have an option of image management, which i would probably take advantage of. however, since i've never considered any 'non-music' major at any school before, i find myself worried about how it will affect my career path.
    nothing of course is set in stone at this point, but i've always wanted to be a producer, or, an A&R coordinator. something along these lines, and not necessarily in the engineering aspects of the business, even though i am very interested in that and have spent some time as an intern.

    so to those of you who are nice enough to help me out: do you think i'll still be alright down the road without a technical major in music, but rather media studies? do companies and organizations place a lot of emphasis or preferance on music majors?

    (if it helps you any, i've been a guitarist for 10 years now which is my main instrument, and also play piano, flute, and saxophone, as well as sing. i've been in various bands and groups for the past 6 years (im still a youngin'), and compose and perform original music. which is to say, im not brand new into the music scene, and adore every aspect of it.)

    thank you!

    -lo
     
  2. DIGIT

    DIGIT Guest

    A degree is good for teaching but, in the real world it means next to nothing.

    Producers, Engineers and Musicians of top caliber rarely (if ever) have received degrees. However, they DO know more than most people with Ph.Ds in their relative areas of expertise.

    The thing with music (and this is going to sound strange) is that the more you think about making money with it and the LESS money you will actually make. I am very serious!

    Just do what you want to do because you LOVE doing it...and, of course, do it at the BEST possible level you are capable of (and then some)!. The rest will come in due time.
     
  3. lokn45

    lokn45 Guest

    thanks for the reply. thats what i've always thought too. i just want to make sure that the people who are going to hire me have the same way of thinking.
     
  4. mark_van_j

    mark_van_j Active Member

    I used to really have a focused future for myself. Sound engineer in a music studio....

    Since life's a bitch, I ended working in almost every other area. That's how I found out about radio stations where I've worked for several years now as an engineer and chief engineer.

    Try not to limit yourself. If you feel you can do media studies, go for it. You seem to have a good grasp on music anyways. That way you can have a knowledge of general media, not just music. By this I mean stuff like film, TV, post-prod...

    I always plan my decisions by how much I will get out of it. Will you learn anything you don't already know by finishing your major in music? Will you learn anything by majoring in media studies? If the answer to both is YES, I say f**k it, do BOTH. :D
     
  5. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    Have you considered taking a typing course?? Capital letters are kind of important. I can't believe you are that lazy. Do you not use your turn signals either??

    I have 2 friends, one with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and the other with a master's degree in electrical engineering. These guys like audio but knew nothing about it and used to consult with me regularly. I thought this rather queer?? (they weren't really queer) I asked them why they would consult me when they went to school for this? They told me, they were never taught this stuff in school. So did they waste their money? If they wanted a career in audio they did. I never went to college but I have designed and built audio consoles from scratch! Designed and installed control rooms and studios. Been assistant chief engineer at 2 major market radio stations. Of course one must have a passion for something and if you do, you are halfway there. I'm very passionate regarding my craft/career. And like any other professional, you never stop learning and will frequently take numerous seminars and other technical courses applicable to what you want. I've worked in the business for over 36 years. I was actually a high school dropout after my junior year because I was already working in my field and had been since I was 15. So everything is relative to what you believe to be important for your self. I always knew that I was sort of like the Quaker Oats guy. "Nothing is better for the, than me". Most teachers suck. So I decided I had to be a better teacher for me. Now I'm here to help confuse others as best I can to ensure my employment viability.

    Remember, don't answer the phone man. I think it's bugged?
    Ms. Remy Ann David
     
  6. pmolsonmus

    pmolsonmus Well-Known Member

    Remy quoting Cheech and Chong???

    Ah the glorious 70's and the not-so-subtle drug references that permeated mainstream media.
    My high school students have begun watching "HR Puff-n-Stuff". I don't believe they would even show it on cable anymore for fear of the PC Police.

    lokn45 - What she said x2!
     
  7. Juliana

    Juliana Guest

    I think it depends on what you want to do in the business. I mean, depending on the job you get or want, you're not going to necesarily have to know wicked advanced music theory and history, you know? It could even be better to do media studies because you'll get a background in something more useful than things like theory and history if you choose to go in the direction of working at a label or something. I'm not sure if a label is the best example, but hopefully you get what im saying. Learning either of those won't hurt, but I dont know. I'm pretty much talking out of my ass. Someone back me up or disagree.
     
  8. lokn45

    lokn45 Guest

    yeah thats true. i was looking more into it, and the plan as of now is a double major in music history and media studies, with a minor in public relations. i figure they all go together. its possible i might switch the music with the PR, just because thats probably more important, since im betting i wont have a job where i need lots of offhand info about beethoven, mozart, and opera. but i really want to keep the music studies in there somewhere. thanks for the replies.
     

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