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How to get audiophile sound quality with durability?

Discussion in 'Monitoring & Headphones' started by rtdreep, May 24, 2010.

  1. rtdreep

    rtdreep Guest

    For a long time I used a pair of Pro Energy 22 speakers in my studio because the sound quality was neutral but outstanding. Well, all it took was one instance of mic feedback to blow out the tweeters. Which has me thinking now. . .how to I get studio monitors that are durable but also have the sound quality of a fine home audio speaker? Does such a thing exist? Most studio monitors I've heard sound like cardboard. Any thoughts you may have would be greatly appreciated.

  2. djmukilteo

    djmukilteo Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2008
    Rainy Roads WA USA
    This is just a thought and my own opinion....but maybe what you need is to go listen to some nice higher end JBL's
    Most of JBL's professional series loudspeakers are extremely durable and are designed with replaceable components if some unforseen damage does occur
    As far as accurate sound quality, I don't think you will find much higher quality...
  3. BushmasterM4

    BushmasterM4 Active Member

    Oct 12, 2007
    Or some vintage Polk Monitor 10's I have a 30 year old set that are still rockin. And the cool thing is Polk still sell replacement tweeters, mids and subs for them !!!
  4. sheet

    sheet Well-Known Member

    May 28, 2003
    Kansas City, KS
    Home Page:
    I don't think that one can say that audiophile speakers are any more or less reliable than professional studio monitors. That is too vague.

    Here is my experience from sales and use. If you look to a manufacturer that makes both audiophile and monitor speakers, you will find the differences to be mostly cosmetic. In some cases there will be more passive options for the audiophile. The components are the same. Adam, Dynaudio, Focal, Tannoy and Genelec come to mind. There are some exceptions. In the case of the Focals, the home version has less compromises because they are not built for a price point.

    Now, anything active is going to be seen as a sonic compromise by the audiophools, because they like to mess with stuff. They are like obsessive PC guys that constantly build computers, always have to mess with it, always feel like it isn't good enough, but is better than something someone else with degrees and patents in programming, electrical engineering, etc could build. But the advantage is that they usually have speaker protection, something audiophool manufacturers like to leave out because it "gets in the way". They also like to leave out rumble filters on their phono stages, which only sells more replacement drivers.

    The best of the best studios have accidents and blow crap up. If you cannot afford to replace your speaker components, you really are in the wrong business or hobby, because it is going to happen. People are people and make mistakes. Nothing lasts forever.

    BTW, you can buy a pair of these speakers all day long for less than $100 on the internet. Buy a couple of pairs and sock them away.

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