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Identify this mic?

Discussion in 'Pro Audio Equipment' started by Jeemy, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Jeemy

    Jeemy Well-Known Member

    Probably not as exciting as it sounds, but somebody dropped around a Sennheiser MD421 which looked to be too old to be useful, I thought I'd ask if anybody has any experience of these mics.

    Its marked as an MD421-U-5, serial number 20947, and the clip slides onto it and is just held by gravity so it didn't look to be of much use.

    He didn't leave it for me to record it but said I could buy it if I wanted, and he'd appreciate knowing the rough value.

    I'm assuming these never had a 'golden age' and we aren't looking at a hidden gem here?
     
  2. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    The Sennheiser 421 is one of the most useful mics ever made. It's probably second only to the Shure SM57.

    If it's in good condition it's worth about $200-300 USD.

    Shake it and see if it sounds like the last Corn Flake in the box. If it does, plug it in and make sure your getting good signal from it.

    If the price is right, I'd buy it.

    Chris
     
  3. Jeemy

    Jeemy Well-Known Member

    signal is straight i gave it the one-two. was aware this is a good mic but thought prob. better to buy newer, what do you reckon?
     
  4. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    It's always nice to buy new.

    But, this mic can last quite a while as long as it's not drop too amny times. You need to be aware that the clip is one of the worst designs ever and it will launch itself if not careful.

    Like I said, if it's in good cond. and you can get it for under $200 USD, it's a good deal.

    Chris
     
  5. Jeemy

    Jeemy Well-Known Member

    cheers chris, will whack it ap der cabinet,

    james
     
  6. Dave62

    Dave62 Guest

    Also be aware that there is a small ring at the base of the mic that is a switch for a high pass filter. M= music=full range, and S= speech=high pass engaged. These mics were widely used in live work for drums and in radio for narration.
     
  7. Jeemy

    Jeemy Well-Known Member

    Yeah I noticed that, when I tried it out the sound seemed to 'dry out' on the S setting, I assumed it was Medium and Small spread on the pickup pattern and so less room.

    Thanks for the info. It seems like there are 2 inbetween positions that may give inbetween settings?
     
  8. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    Nope the S means speech and the M is Music.

    Basically a bass roll-off swith. M is no roll-off and S is max roll-off.

    Chris
     

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