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I'm gonna build a studio on the road. Thoughts?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by rockstardave, Mar 3, 2006.

  1. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    Hey guys, so I do a lot of music stuff in my area .. booking, web design, management, etc.

    I just bought a Mackie ONYX 1220 mixer (for sale: (Dead Link Removed)#267521 ). So i'm going to upgrade to a 1620 because I need the additional XLR inputs.

    What I want to do is put together a "recording studio on the road". Have bands hire me out to do a live recording of their show independantly of the sound guy (because I dont know anything about live sound yet).

    I can bring my mixer, mics, and computer to a show and record it. Then master tracks and give (sell) them to the band. Neat huh?

    So I'll need some mics... 4+ for drums (kick, snare, 2x overhead), vocals, guitar, bass, and keyboard. Any suggestions for mics? The only mic I already have is an AKG C1000 condensor mic. It's freakin sweet so I'd probably use it as an overhead (which means I'd probably want to get another one for the other overhead, right??).

    Suggestions would be awesome, thanks guys!

    -Dave
     
  2. Zoro

    Zoro Guest

    I wouldnt spent on mics if you already have people with the PA set up, what I would do is if they have a mixing board with the capabilities of some Bus, specialy 8 if possible, just get you premix from the main board and routed to you gear and get ready to rock, you just need to make sure that you have a good premix so it sound good when recording it to your DAW.

    Just a thougth, good luck.

    Zoro. :)
     
  3. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    Hey thanks for the quick response.

    The guys I know with a PA have a very limited one (my 1620 itself it worth as much as their entire setup!). Their mixer definitely does not have a bus, and if I'm going from band to band, I need to have my own gear anyways to make sure I dont run into problems with bands not having enough gear. know what i mean?

    Any more thoughs?
     
  4. Zoro

    Zoro Guest

    Then if you are buying the gear for miking get a couple of 57's, c1000's, and a beta 52A for the KIK, these are great for live miccing and recording drums, plus you don't want to have 1000"s of $$ on just mics on a stage with strange people, you know.
    Additionally regarding the bass and keyboards is always good if you run them with a Direct Box instead of miking, for guitar the 57, vocals the Beta 58A or the 87 C.

    Best regards Zoro.
     
  5. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    Any reason you say a Beta 52a over an AKG d112? Any experience with the AKG? The numbers are a little bit better, but I'm pretty unfamiliar with all of this. I love my C1000, so I'm a little biased. :p

    I've only got the 8 xlr inputs (4 drum mics, 3 vocals, guitar = all 8 xlrs will be used), so I'll need to find a good way to go thru a 1/4" cable into the mixer.
     
  6. Zoro

    Zoro Guest

    I think that the beta 52 have a great low frequency response and you are right I am not familiar with the AKG. If you ran out of inputs you will probably then need to purchase a analog mixer and premix the drums in stereo and that way you'll have another 6 channels available for the rest, and :) yea the c1000's are great isn't.
     
  7. twon

    twon Guest

    for kick mics dont discount the audix d6 either. i have used both it and the beta52 on different occasions and they are both great mics. im using the d6 abit more tho at the moment....

    *edit* dont forget snakes, etc as well... */edit*

    twon
     
  8. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    i dont want to premix drums because the best part about the onyx line is that each input shows up as a seperate track on the computer. so being able to eq/pan/mix each drum seperately is what makes a live recording become studio quality. (y)

    thanks for the help ya'll!

    ... what this about snakes?
     
  9. twon

    twon Guest

    a snake is a multicore cable. the question is where are you going to be sitting? will you be on the side of the stage? snakes will let you sit further away, and will make cable runs more easy to deal with. you could put the box from the snake on stage and the other end would plug into your stuff
     
  10. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    oh, yeah thats the plan... probably a 50-100ft. know any good places to get a deal on one? i'm not sure if i trust myself to build one.
     
  11. twon

    twon Guest

    where are you located?
     
  12. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    near buffalo, ny
     
  13. MadMax

    MadMax Well-Known Member

    About snakes...

    You will need to determine whether you will need a single isolated or dual isolated split.

    What that means is that you will be supplying the entire interconnect from FOH, optional Moitor Beach and your tracking rig.

    The direct feed either goes to FOH or Monitor world. (Whoever is supplying phantom) to ensure that musicians on stage don't get the crap shocked out of em' when they step up to a mic while playing an instument.

    I opted for a 48x8 dual ISO Whirlwind w/ Jensen's. 2-300 foot trunks, and 3-25 foor fans. By far, the most expensive piece of gear I own. Then again, it IS the heart of the entire tracking chain. Garbage interconnect means garbage tracks.

    HTH,
    Max
     
  14. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    How do I determine what kind of split I need? I will simply be micing the entire setup, plugging mics into the snake, and then snake into mixer. The mixer has firewire out into the computer, which takes each mixer channel and turns it into a seperate track.

    I dont' know what FOH or Monitor Beach means. Sorry i'm such a newbie!
     
  15. bluesdudeo

    bluesdudeo Active Member

    F.O.H = Front of house ... as in where you sit and listen/mix/ in front of the desk. ....
     
  16. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    oh yeah duh, i should have known.

    well for now i'm not going to be doing any FOH work. I'm strictly recording. Once I get the hang of it, I'll probably work my way into doing sound as well. One thing at a time though ya know?

    thanks for all the help guys. I've got a pair of SM-57s coming and bidding on a beta52a!
     
  17. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    You're looking at this much too simplistically. You need to share the microphones, on stage, for the band, with the PA system. Which means you need to invest in a transformer isolated splitter box. Good-quality splitter transformers will sound good. Cheap junky ones are not worth wasting money on, so don't. You'll also want to make sure that your splitter has "ground lift" switches, to eliminate ground loop hum, which you will quickly discover will become quite unbearable. So, you may even need to purchase a Fuhrman transformer isolated balanced power distribution for yourself? You think this is easy? It absolutely is not! You only need to derive a 2 track stereo mix, for live television or live FM radio broadcast. Otherwise you should multitrack and mix after-the-fact because if you're trying to do this with headphones, in all likelihood, it will come out sounding like crap! Now go take some more recording courses and think about this again, carefully.

    Live recording engineer
    Ms. Remy Ann David
    and the Audio Oasis
     
  18. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    whoa chill out, i think you must have misread something.

    in my first post i said that i was going to multi-track and mix after-the-fact.

    can you direct me to a place where i can read more about this stuff? I came here hoping to be able to learn something.
     
  19. twon

    twon Guest

    rockstardave,

    what remy is saying is that all the microphones on stage need to go to multiple places; you need a feed from each mic, but so does foh. (monitors will need one too if there is a separate monitor desk). so you will need splitters. there is no point having 2 mics for each source on stage just so that foh and recording can have a feed each is there....? and definitely do what remy mentioned about transformers....

    twon
     
  20. rockstardave

    rockstardave Active Member

    ok thanks for the explanation twon. are there feedback problems or such when using 2 mics on a bass rig, for example? or it is just a hassle?

    any places where I can read about splitters more in-depth too? i work with a lot of really small bands, that either barely have a PA or dont have one at all. so for now there's not mics on bass, guitars, nor drums.

    but i'll definitely need to do some splitting down the road it seems..

    thanks agian
     

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