Interesting ideas but not sure about the last sentence.

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by Thomas W. Bethel, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    From the internet.

    At present the Industry Standard sound quality is based on the specifications of the Red Book Convention, which is a sampling rate of 44.1 Khz and a word resolution of 16 bits.

    A music production is considered to meet the Industry Standard when its frequencies show adequate harmonic balancing with alignment of the 3 main densities:

    Bass (20-300hz)
    Middle Range (1K-8k)
    Hi Frequencies (10K-20K)

    The music should sound punchy and clear, with good dynamics and max. high peaks at -0.5 db, (depending on music style).

    Output levels should never be too loud as it means that the dynamic range has been compromised ("crunched").

    A refined mastering job would show adequate individual alignment within a 25 to 30 frequency spectrum (our mastering standard).
     
  2. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Hmm. I definitely disagree with the last statement.

    Anyone wanna hear a classical song that needs a subwoofer to reproduce the low end?

    The stuff I record from my church, I have no need for the low end. Or the extreme high end.

    "Punchy and clear"
    Tell that to Goldfrapp. Their 'A&E' song sounds like, I dunno. It's about as punchy as a wet paper bag.
     
  3. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Well-Known Member

    Pretty much all of it sounds like...

    I don't want to say "hogwash" - But it certainly doesn't make much sense.

    Eh, the more I read it, "hogwash" would almost be an insult to hogs. "Industry standard?" I'd like to see this "standard" of frequency representation (it doesn't exist). And what are the frequencies between 300Hz and 1k called?

    Output levels should never be too loud?

    25-30 frequency spectrum? That's awfully limited... My old Radio Shack RTA on my home stereo back in the 80's had 30 (or 31) bands. And what's with "individual alignment" of said frequencies?

    (Sounds like a rough draft of something from HairBall...)
     
  4. BobRogers

    BobRogers Well-Known Member

    Having worked in a university environment for most of my adult life, this looks really familiar to me. It looks like the work of a committee of bureaucrats who think they can raise standards and increase quality by making a bunch of rules and spouting high flying rhetoric. In my experience, what little effect they actually have is more likely to be negative.
     
  5. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Well-Known Member

    To me, it looks like the exact opposite - Some company trying to make it seem as if there are a bunch of bureaucrats making "standards" and such (while they don't actually exist).

    You know - Trying to "educate the consumer" -- :lol:
     
  6. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    Very mportant? to the mastering?? and to the sound of the song???
     
  7. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Nonsense. I scoop that junk out, all it does is waste sonic space and make the bass muddy.

    300-1K is where I struggle most, but that's irrelevant. Also, bass, IMO, should start lower than 300.
     
  8. NCdan

    NCdan Guest

    I would certainly give more than 3 blanket frequency ranges:

    What about subs? What about dividing low mids and high mids? And what about separating highs from extended highs? I have never considered 40 Hz a bass frequency and I've never considered 6 KHz midrange.
     
  9. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    Where did this "information" come from?
     
  10. Thomas W. Bethel

    Thomas W. Bethel Well-Known Member

    From the same site as these came from but is was removed soon after I posted it here. But it magically reappeared here on another site http://musicguy.com/mastering_details1.html <ADDITIONAL NOTE as of 6-28-09 this site is no longer up.>


    What is Music Mastering?
    Mastering is the process of optimizing all individual frequency levels to meet Industry Standards.

    What is the Industry Standard?
    At present the Industry Standard sound quality is based on the CD specifications of the Red Book Convention which is a sampling rate of 44.1 kHz and a word resolution of 16 bits.

    What does M.D.P. mean?
    Maximum Delivery Potential, a term created by <name removed>, not listed on audio engineering books:
    "It's the art of aligning audio frequencies to a specific dynamic shape and harmonic balance, in order to obtain a maximum delivery potential".
     
  11. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Well-Known Member

    Charades! Two words.
    First word: Male cow...
    Second word: Sounds like "bit".

    To clarify: I don't think you can really cookie-cut any song and say "we should reduce it so that it is equal across the whole spectrum". Not totally, anyway.
     
  12. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    interesting, where did it come from? didn't Chris Athens Coin the term "i believe your mix has reached is maximum potential"? or something like that... This "term" sounds like a "borrow"...
     
  13. Massive Mastering

    Massive Mastering Well-Known Member

    That was "volume potential" -- If I'm not mistaken, I was actually using that before Chris. But Chris is a stand-up guy and a respected acquaintance. So he can have it if he wants. :lol:

    The "Maximum Delivery Potential" is the giveaway for where that stuff came from...

    There's a psychological term for this, but I can't remember what it is. Anyway...

    It's not a "term" - It's a phrase. It's has nothing to do with audio in the first place. Why the hell would it be in audio engineering books?

    MFP - Maximum Fluoride Protection -- Remember that? Crest was it? I don't think that was in any dental books either.
    Here, it's the art of hand-delivering a package to the FedEx hub in Schaumburg. No drivers, no stop-off points, no warehouses. Right to the hub and hand it to the gal behind the counter. When it absolutely, positively needs to be there overnight, Maximum Delivery Potential.
    It's still on his (his "business partner's?") other site...
     
  14. niclaus

    niclaus Active Member

    not so hard to find out..!!!
     
  15. FUBARd

    FUBARd Guest

    Looks to me like it's from an online audio school advert. Pehaps one based in Mexico?
     
  16. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    :lol: The source is linked further up. Which in itself is quite amusing.
     

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