Jack Joseph Puig on Mixing

Discussion in 'Tracking / Mixing / Editing' started by DonnyThompson, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    I got this vid from the Waves website, so I'm sure that the video will get around to trying to sell us something
    eventually - LOL - I haven't watched the entire vid, I just wanted to see what he had to say about his mixing style. Of most interest to me was around the 3:00 mark to around 10:00 or so... there may be more informative stuff after that, but I haven't watched past that yet.

    I do like the section where he talks about Ocean Way Recording, his working on certain records having dynamics and depth, as opposed to other stuff he's done that's more current and "in your face" sounding, and how ultimately it's the song which dictates how you should mix it.

    anyway, enjoy. ;)

     
    audiokid and thatjeffguy like this.
  2. pcrecord

    pcrecord Don't you want the best recording like I do ? Well-Known Member

    You should listen to it entirely, at the end he says that he hold it all to DonnyThompson :D
     
  3. pcrecord

    pcrecord Don't you want the best recording like I do ? Well-Known Member

    It was a interesting interview, he has a great view on how to pick gear for what sound you want to acheive and how to mix history gave us best.
     
  4. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    LOL! I just spit coffee everywhere while I was laughing out loud reading that. You owe me one new computer keyboard, Marco. ;)

    I like how he mentions that "70's music had a certain 3D vibe to it..." he described it as "things up front because there were things farther away, things over here because there were things over there"... the way he said it was funny, LOL... But, he's not wrong, at least not IMO.

    I still mix that way much of the time, not only because I like to, but also because I was taught that imaging-style of mixing in my formative years as an engineer by an instructor who was a professional engineer, and he was mixing records with that kind of imaging during that time. Much of the depth and imaging that he obtained started with the recording process, using mic arrays like Blumlein, XY, M/S, Dummy Head, Decca Stand, etc.

    I find that with a lot of modern mixes, that imaging has drifted away and become less popular, with a more "in your face" sound with all the tracks. I don't hear that kind of "depth" and dimension as much with newer productions.

    Recordings used to have more dynamics, too. - I'm speaking in generalizations here, I'm sure there are newer mixes out there that have that kind of imaging, depth, and dynamics - I just don't seem to hear it as much as I used to.
     
  5. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    @pcrecord @audiokid

    Here's a great example I found which I think demonstrates the "3D-ish vibe" thing that Puig mentioned above. I think this a perfect example of depth, space, nuance, with an ethereal quality that - for me, anyway - makes it interesting to listen to :


    I've always loved Gilmour's voice anyway.... it's like velvet - calming, soothing, but incredibly melodic at the same time. I could be wrong on this, but it seems like his voice would be so easy to record and mix, because of his timbre and style.

    I'm also a big fan of his guitar playing, and his tone, too. I love the tones he gets for his solos.

    There are two guitar players - one is David Gilmour, and the other is Marc Knopfler; both of whom I feel to be incredibly tasteful players, who also happen to have fantastic guitar tone(s).

    I think that both of these guys - and others like them - occasionally get overlooked for the "shreddings" of other guitar "wizards", those who seem to have more "flash" than substance - there are a few who have both, and while I respect players who can play in that way, for the styles that I produce and record, that "flash" doesn't matter to me in the studio... I really don't care how fast you can play. Tasteful parts, along with a guitar tone that fits the song perfectly - those are what matter the most to me.

    IMHO of course.

    Enjoy the song. ;)

    d.
     
    pcrecord likes this.
  6. pcrecord

    pcrecord Don't you want the best recording like I do ? Well-Known Member

    Try one of these, you can spill stuff on it as much as you want ! ;)
    Cube-Laser-Virtual-Keyboard-1212.jpg
     
  7. audiokid

    audiokid Staff

    a big part of this sound , sounds like a staircase reverb to me. It would be interesting if this is the sound people seem to be drawn to when referring to that sound. .
     
  8. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Well-Known Member

    JJP seems like a pretty cool dude. Maybe a little odd, but he did play bass. it's amazing how relaxed and down to earth some of these top guys seem. Considering the pressure, some of them seem to just be artists with it. I like JJPs attitude, but his waves pjig tech is a little weak. The puigchild is cool, don't know or care how authentic it sounds, I does some fun heavy handed stuff.
     
  9. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member


    Yes there is the reverb thing happening, and of course that plays a part - but I was also referring to the dynamics of the track, along with panning, too. I think that this is a big factor in that type of multi dimension sense, because when every track in a song is the same - or of similar - volume, it starts to become less dimensional.

    Here's another example of a what I feel is a "multi dimensional" mix...

     

Share This Page