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KRK vs NS 10 monitors

Discussion in 'Monitoring & Headphones' started by freundlich, Dec 26, 2001.

  1. freundlich

    freundlich Guest

    I've been working for a year now with NS-10s on one room and krk k-rok on another. The NS-10s have a small sub to help the bass. Althogh I like the krk's I keep coming back to the 10's and I'm always shocked at the difference - in comparison the 10's sound muffled but somehow they highlight problems that the krk's don't (levels, reverb lengths and low-mid junk). The krk's on the other hand highlight problems with pan, sibilance and noises that the 10's don't. The question is whether it's possible to enjoy both worlds? is there a monitor with high resolution (like the krk) that has the strengths of the NS-10? does anybody has a different opinion on the krk?
     
  2. miketholen

    miketholen Guest

    I use Genelec 1031's with a Genelec sub.
    not one complaint. from me or anyone else.
    they are quite a bit more money than what you have but that's the deal. no more frustration trying to get the best of both worlds.
     
  3. Jon Best

    Jon Best Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2001
    See, and that's the beauty of having a lot of different manufacturers. Personally, I think the S30's with the ribbon tweeter are the only Genelecs worth a crap. I'd look at the Haflers for reasonably inexpensive. Above that, you really have to go listen to everything. I'm partial to Questeds...

    Originally posted by miketholen:
    I use Genelec 1031's with a Genelec sub.
    not one complaint. from me or anyone else.
    they are quite a bit more money than what you have but that's the deal. no more frustration trying to get the best of both worlds.
     
  4. RandomGuest

    RandomGuest Guest

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2001
    Originally posted by miketholen:
    I use Genelec 1031's with a Genelec sub.
    not one complaint. from me or anyone else.
    they are quite a bit more money than what you have but that's the deal. no more frustration trying to get the best of both worlds.


    Mike, I have the exact same set-up you do. (1031a/1092a) Since I've been coming here, I've heard nothing but slams against Genelec (midrange scooped, too pretty to translate well, etc.) Jon Best's post is a typical example. It was getting to the point where I thought Genelec was going to join the unholy quartet of Behringer, Digidesign, Alesis, and Mackie around here. As I was getting a real inferiority complex, I was thinking I needed to "graduate" to ADAMs or something else ASAP. But since you are clearly a person who is extraordinarily selective about sound, I am pleasantly surprised to find you are very happy with your set-up. Any further words of encouragement (or warning) you would care to give me in this matter?
     
  5. Mike Simmons

    Mike Simmons Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2001
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Home Page:
    Hi, I'd like to chime in here too if I could.

    I used NS10's when I worked at a commercial voice-over house and didn't like them. When I opened my own shop in 1989 I chose Tannoy NFM-8's with a QSC 1200. Again, I was doing voice over mostly and was happy with them. Now I'm starting to record more music projects and want to upgrade my monitoring in order to get a better sense of how my mixes will translate out of the studio.

    My sales rep (who I trust) is partial to Quested's but I don't want to start asking him questions (and initiate the "buying process") until I have done my homework. So... what approach should I take to evaluate monitors and what should my considerations be? (I guess I should mention my $3K to $4K spending limit)

    My fear is that I'll line up a bunch of monitors, choose the one that really sounds great to me, and find myself with a different variety of translation problem later (one that I was unable to recognize during the comparison test).

    I was actually just going to search on this topic but since I saw it here I thought I'd jump in. I apologize for the newbie nature of my quandry and most humbly throw myself at your feet and mercy!
     
  6. Masternfool

    Masternfool Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2001
    I also use the GENS 1031a, And I have friends coming over to check their finished mixes on them..What does that say?...Harry
     
  7. Jon Best

    Jon Best Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2001
    Well, let me qualify a little... I think around here we all are guilty of overblowing the sometimes relatively small differences between certain pieces of gear. I know a number of experienced people happy with their Genelecs, and I have heard many mixes (and some masters) done on them that have sounded great. I just don't do my best work on them without having to think about their sound when I am making decisions, which I don't want to have to do too much.

    It is remarkable, however, when you put the ribbon Genelecs in a room with a couple of the regular ones, whatever the size. The ribbons have a huge amount of depth, the top is very, very smooth, and the (IMO positive) difference is not terribly subtle.

    Originally posted by littledog:

    ) Since I've been coming here, I've heard nothing but slams against Genelec (midrange scooped, too pretty to translate well, etc.) Jon Best's post is a typical example.
     
  8. RandomGuest

    RandomGuest Guest

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2001
    Hmmmm.... I have 1031A's with the giant 1094 Sub

    The mids are pissing me off a little, I was shopping round for a replacement set. (paused) Presently I have a Behringer ultracurve accross em, scooping out the ear catching mid frequency I dislike and lineing them up to a target curve that has worked for me in the past.

    :)
     
  9. slicraider

    slicraider Guest

    You mentioned that you've tried different speakers at various times. Well there is your answer. I do most of my eq on NS10s but I always have at least two different pairs of speakers when mixing. No speaker will be all things. The trick is to make small adjustments so that your mix sounds right on two or three well tuned sets of speakers. Then print a cd that the client can reference in their car. If the mix seems right on all these speakers then you've got it nailed. As an assistant I never witnessed anyone using just one pair of speakers, ever. As an engineer I find that cross referencing is essential for real world translation.
     
  10. MadMoose

    MadMoose Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2001
    Why not both the KRK's and the NS-10's. When a mix sounds good on two or more sets of speakers you have a mix that will probably hold up to the outside world.
     
  11. freundlich

    freundlich Guest

    Well, that's what I do now (after a few unpleasant lessons) - I dump some audio to Dat and go listen in the other room (NS-10's). I'm just, well, frustrated whenever I think "hey, this choir needs some more meat to sound really full, but, wait, maybe it's the speaker" so I add some bass and it sounds muddy on the 10's and I come back and remove it and it sounds thin on the krk's and... well, I suppose we should get another set in the same room. Thanks for sharing your experience, all of you!
     

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