Low-Cut , Hi-Pass

Discussion in 'Mastering' started by yellowrobin, Nov 11, 2005.

  1. yellowrobin

    yellowrobin Guest

    Would a mastering engineer on any particular recording cut the bass freq at a particular Hz say :(40 Hz to 50 Hz) with a high pass filter as a "normal" or standard part of the EQ mastering process?
    It seems to me you do have to be very careful with the low end. If it isn’t "cut" properly it will rumble smaller or cheaper speakers and break up at a high volumes, and if cut too much, your recording will have no balls .So what I am wondering is; is it a” per song” EQ for low-cut hi-pass, or is there a "norm" at a certain Hz, that begins the EQ process. Thanks
     
  2. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    not the norm.

    seems a bit high for a hi-pass. I might shelf down 40 or 50 but not cut it. I would cut below maybe 20hz if it's a problem.
     
  3. yellowrobin

    yellowrobin Guest

    I might shelf down 40 or 50 but not cut it

    Thanks Michael , thats what I was looking for.
     
  4. iznogood

    iznogood Member

    i cut at 40 all the time.... for pop music....

    more than 90% of speakers say nothing below 45-50.....

    and as a rule of thumb you need four times as many watts to reproduce the same level at half the frequency..... and the woofer has to move four times as long......

    for purist work it's another matter..... a matter of judgement
     
  5. hueseph

    hueseph Well-Known Member

    Not too many people that can hear below 20hz much less speakers that can produce 20hz. I thought rumble occurred between 30-50hz.
     
  6. iznogood

    iznogood Member

    the term rumble is usually used to describe the low frequency resonances in vinyl records.... mostly below 20Hz

    i can hear 14Hz in headphones...
     
  7. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    I can hear below 20hz. A big mistake is taking these subs completely out. If they are too loud, then they can be a problem, but the depth of a recording with a nice balanced 20hz to say 60hz can't be beat. Not to mention the damage you are doing to the low end via phase shift or filters by using a high pass filter.
     
  8. LexFactory

    LexFactory Guest

    As a general rule I set my EQ to roll off below 16-20Hz. Any roll-off has a slope to it (12dB per octave, 24dB per octave, etc), so I'm not actually completely getting rid of the low end. Just want to be sure that my recordings are tolerated by the largest number of playback systems.

    Additionally, I master some bass-heavy stuff, and I want to keep the low end from pumping my compressor or limiter too much. That said, thank GOODNESS for the Waves L3 Multimaximizer! Multiband limiting is the WAY.
     
  9. iznogood

    iznogood Member

    "Multiband limiting is the WAY."

    yes.... the fastest way to pancakes... :lol:
     
  10. Cucco

    Cucco Distinguished Member

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

    How do you mean? Pancake flat mixes or having to supplement your income due to loss of clients by working at the McDonald's breakfast shift flipping them??
     
  11. iznogood

    iznogood Member

    working at the McD's to supplement your income due to loss of clients caused by pancake flat mixes!!!

    :lol: :lol: :shock: :lol: :lol:
     
  12. Calgary

    Calgary Active Member

    :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
     

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