1. Register NOW and become part of this fantastic knowledge base forum! This message will go away once you have registered.

Make vocals fit using cakewalk

Discussion in 'Vocals' started by longhom28, May 21, 2003.

  1. longhom28

    longhom28 Guest

    Hey i'm realy a newbie at recording. I'm hard working guitarist vocalist etc. So I bought Cakewalk homestudio 2002. Now I can take my time recording, and realy get the song's the way want.The prob is i have no idea how to make the vocals fit in.They stand so out, i'm ashamed to play my songs to anyone. And then people think that's like my quaility. I'm looking to make my vocals sound like Tom De Longe of BLink-182. There's like this, i don't know what u call it over his voice.when the songs's end u can hear it.like an wierd echo.I prob not achieve this with cakewalk, but i would like to know what I must do in Cake walk, to first of all just make my vocals fit in, cause at the moment is so terrible.on the help file is says add chorus, but it doesn't do anythin.I know how an equalizer looks but don't know how they work.please tell me like equalizer settings, effects i don't know, whatever needs to be done.I'm willing to learn even if it takes time.i have got time to experiment, but i don't know $*^t. I realy have great songs.And if u can tell me some good settings fot lead guitars and rhythem and drums bass etc.Like a crash course in recording a punk song.we have double vocals in some songs.please explain step by step and in simple term cause i don't know anythin.or if u can give me links to where i can download tutorials.thing is i don't have the budget to go study this but i have a great ear. Please, if u have time.thanks a million.
  2. vinniesrs

    vinniesrs Active Member

    May 12, 2003
    Hey, Longhorn, relax man! Like any sound vocals are made up of more than one element of sound. If you break it down it goes somethong like this. The body, or power of the voice is found around 250hz and down, with 80 hz and down pretty much useless. Too much body? Lessen these freq's. From 250hz up to about 2-3khz is the tonal range, shaping vowels and making notes. If your track sounds honky drop out some of these freq's. Sibilence is the articulation of constanants S's T's. This element of the voice can be found in the 3khz and up category with the most noticeable freq's seen around the 4-6khz mark.
    Now you can eq nice. Fx are different.
    Use a reverb or a delay to place your vocals in the same imaginary acoustic space as every thing else. Maybe the singer sounds too far away now right? Back off the wetdry blend of your effect until you can still just hear the effect, and the vocals come up front a bit. You will have to experiment with decay times and types of reverbs. See what you like.
    When your mix is finished you should hear everything clean and clear. No noise, no excessive tones ringing out, no bucket over your head.
    You can use the eq's on other instruments to make room for things in the mix, like rolling a bit of low-mid off of a guitar that is clouding the bass a bit. Don't forget about the pan control. Stereo imaging can help clean things up as well as adding space to your recording. If you do this, put your mix to mono regularly to make sure it still sounds ok.
    You can also use eq's to shape your fx too. Don't be too drastic with anything at first, subtle changes are the key to a smooth mix.
    As for my own effects settings and eq guidelines, this is all I'm prepared to offer you. These things are what makes each engineer unique from the next one, and you need to find your style too.
    Good luck.

    "The worlds failures are those who did not realize how close they were to sucess when they gave up."
    Thomas Edison
  3. dave berry

    dave berry Guest

    that blink 182 vocal sounds like it is made up of a whole bunch of things but for certain you can tell it is recorded through a great mic/pre/compressor because the hard "S" and "T" sounds come through nice and smooth and his gut bursting yells and breathy whispers all sit comfortable in the songs (this could also be the result of a very skilled someone also riding a fader during mixing). It also sounds like doubling vocals that split into harmonies in some places with chorus/ sometimes a slight stereo delay and a touch reverb too. the bypass switch is your indespensible friend while wading through all these wonderful things.

Share This Page