1. Register NOW and become part of this fantastic knowledge base forum! This message will go away once you have registered.

Matched pairs

Discussion in 'Recording' started by mathematika, Sep 27, 2003.

  1. mathematika

    mathematika Guest

    Hi

    Is is possible to get a pair of Rode NT2s matched, which were not originaly matched at the factory? In any case, does it really matter to the quality of the recording?

    Cheers!

    David.
     
  2. heinz

    heinz Guest

    It is unlikely that you could identically match up two NT2's by buying them separately. I am not aquainted with that particular mic, so take that as a generalization. That being said, they may be "close enough for rock-n-roll", if your dealer is flexible you could try a few out and find the one that matches the first mic as closely as possible.
     
  3. Doublehelix

    Doublehelix Well-Known Member

    I remember hearing a technique one time for matching mics...( NO, not the key jingling technique!).

    It had something to do with micing a sine wave, and placing the mics out of phase with each other, and the two mics that best cancel each out (i.e. are silent when played back together), are best matched...

    Anyone have any more specific details?
     
  4. falkon2

    falkon2 Well-Known Member

    I think you'd want to simply reverse polarity, not shift phase, and sweep the sine wave across the frequency spectrum to test out total response.
     
  5. Doublehelix

    Doublehelix Well-Known Member

    That is what I meant...sorry. I use the terms interchangably, and I know it is not technically correct, so thanks for correcting me...

    When you switch the polarity, it switches the phase of the audio file...
     
  6. downflow

    downflow Guest

    Isn't reverse polarity the same as 180 degrees out of phase? I'm asking for clarification, not being a smart ass.
     
  7. falkon2

    falkon2 Well-Known Member

    Technically, if we're talking about a repeating waveform, then yes... a 180' phase shift would give the same effect as inverting polarity.

    Try phase shifting a transient, and you get a mess that looks nothing like a mirror image, though. This is especially true of impulses.

    ;)
     

Share This Page