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Microphones for project studio

Discussion in 'Microphones' started by billlee, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. billlee

    billlee Guest

    Hi,
    I have a project studio and am starting to invest in microphones. I have the basics, a 57, a 58. Can anyone suggest three to four mics that are "must haves". Along with my 57 and 58, I was thinking of maybe an AKGC3000, or AKG414. Any other sugesstions. Thanks.
     
  2. route909

    route909 Guest

    Studio Projects C1, Røde NT1000. I have 2 nt1000s for stereo recording of most anything and a C1 for solo vocals. They are 2 really great microphones for nothing at all! Check out the new røde NT5 and see of you like it too, it´s a small diaphragm mic.
     
  3. I would recomend that you buy some inexpensive classic mics. These not only sound great, but hold their value. Neumann km84's sound fantastic and can be bought used for around $600 bucks. The silver AKG C414 EB (make SURE it has the original capsule) is a true classic mic that can be found for under $1k. Sennhieser 421 and 441 mics are great workhorses and are easy to find used. Be careful because they tend to get a lot of abuse.

    If you want a new mic, I like the Soundeluxe U195 a lot.
     
  4. sign

    sign Guest

    If you can afford it, buy at least one top quality microphone.
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    I think you would be very disappointed in the C3000.
     
  6. Traumakind

    Traumakind Guest

    No, you would not necessarily be disappointed.
    I have a C3000 (the original version) in my project studio and it is a very good mic for acoustic guitar and soft vocals, be they male or female. I bought mine for 200$ and it works just fine.

    I have heard bad stuff bout the "B" version (guy I know gave it a bad review in a german recording mag, but it was a prototype, so it might be OK, too). Since this is only hear and say, you`d better try for yourself.

    Cheers,
    Stefan
     
  7. Mike Simmons

    Mike Simmons Active Member

    ;)

    Of the mics mentioned here I can second the 421's... they are real workhorses.

    Nice inexpensive mics might include; AT4050, MK012, ECM8000... but these may not be "must haves" for most folks.

    Try searching the database for lots more advice. Good luck!
     
  8. coldsnow

    coldsnow Active Member

    Yea another vote for at least one really good mic. Stuff like the Studio Projects and the Rode NTK are great for the price but I've owned both and although they are worth having, I don't believe they take the place of a really great vocal mic. Depends on your budget though, if you don't have the budget to buy a high end mic those will do just fine. A good singer can make any of the formentioned mics sound good and a bad singer can make a great mic sound bad. You may want to look at Lawson's mics. They offer some of the best deals in high end mics.
     
  9. ahyatt

    ahyatt Active Member

    I think you hit it right on the head. If the budget just can't afford an expensive mic, "some" of the lower cost mics will do 90% as good. There is a diminishing return to where you pay much more, but don't get that much more. If the song is good, along with good engineering skills, you will get great results with a Studio Projects or the RODE.
     
  10. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    I don't know - I know everyone's mileage varies - but what other mics do you have to compare it to, Stefan? Maybe you have an unusually good one, or I have an unusually bad one, but I can probably safely say that of all the condensor mics I have ever used, it is probably my 3rd least favorite. (Original Oktava large diaphragm would be #1, AKG C1000 would be #2). Really ugly sounding upper mids.

    Of course, my opinion means no more, (and perhaps a good deal less!) than yours, but at least the prospective buyer should know there are some seriously mixed opinions about this model!

    I'm firmly in the "get one good one" camp, if at all possible. If you can't spring for the 2 grand, maybe the TLM 103 would be a nice compromise. In the cheap category, I've been hearing nice things about the new Shure KSM-27, although I admit I've never laid hands on one yet. Good luck!
     
  11. sign

    sign Guest

    Yeah, I have one Neumann M149 and wish I had two of them.

    I agree with littledog about the C3000, not bad for hi hat.

    Have fun :tu:
     
  12. spratz

    spratz Guest

    I would have to say that the TLM-103 with the Peavey VMP-2 is a great package for those on a budget (but needing a good sound). I would also like to plug the EV RE-20. Like the 421 it is a work horse.

    jason
     
  13. Dave McNair

    Dave McNair Active Member

    I'd urge you to get a pair of Audio Technica 4050's, a great all purpose mic. Drum overheads, vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, Leslie cab, vocals, really anything. Also 4033's are very similar sounding, but cardioid only.
     
  14. Traumakind

    Traumakind Guest

    Yeah, that`s why I posted, too. :)
    You are right of course, it depends on the application. For the stuff i used it for (mostly on a female singer with a beautiful warm voice) it worked a treat. On a male singer with a harsh voice it was terrible.
    I had people asking me "to which studio did you went to record the vocals?". Guess how broad my smile was when I showed them our basement :D

    Shameless self promotion: In case you are interested, http://www.traumakind.de. under "music" try "crater lake", all acoustic guitars, strings and vocals recorded through a C3000.

    Oh, and BTW, the best way to use it is letting the upside dangling at chin height, just in case you did you know.

    Cheers,
    Stefan
     
  15. droog

    droog Active Member

    1. a variety of dynamics, eg 57, 58, 88, 421, whatever

    2. one or two good condensers (i've got oktavas, you can do better)

    3. a ribbon, if you can find one
     
  16. sign

    sign Guest

    Yeah, Max is so right, get a ribbon!

    A ribbon will never disappoint you, yesterday I used a Beyer M260 on violin.
     
  17. Don Rowe

    Don Rowe Guest

    I agree about getting a ribbon..Try the Oktava ML19...On Ebay someone was selling a pair for something like 450.00..
     
  18. Sure, maybe if your running it through a Mackie into a Alesis 3630 to a budget soundcard into your DAW they're "90% as good", where you get that 90% figure is a mystery to me.

    If you have a good signal chain the differences are not subtle, until you get a good signal chain you will be forever doomed to believe the hype and not realize the full value of having good equipment.
     
  19. ozraves

    ozraves Active Member

    I think most of the equation is talent in front of and behind the mic and matching the mic to the situation.

    I've heard some great results out of a Rode NT1, a Studio Projects C1 and an Audio Technica AT3035. The Rode NT1 great results and the Studio Projects C1 great results were by the same persons. The Audio Technica AT3035 results were by a second group of people.

    I've yet to hear good results out of the much talked about MXL V67G. I've heard a lot of mediocre sounding vocals through these that probably would have sounded the same through a $6K Sony tube mic.

    There are absolutely no rules or rules of thumb. Use your ears. Most times the usual names will be the ones you like as that is how they became classics but every now and then you'll come across an AT3035. Good luck. :w:
     
  20. chessparov

    chessparov Active Member

    billie, if you e-mail Studio Projects they'll
    send you a listening CD of their mikes.
    The C3 and T3 are multi-pattern and sound very
    good. The website is http://www.studioprojects.com

    P.S. They are also coming out with the B3,
    see the website for details.
    (no I don't work for them-just a happy
    C1 customer!)
     

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