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mixer + audio interface ?

Discussion in 'Recording' started by daviddevic, Dec 8, 2011.

  1. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    Hello,
    I'm new to music recording. I'm an amateur musician and I'm looking for a mixer and an audio interface for some small band home recordings, live sessions, making songs...

    I'm considering the mackie's onyx 1220i that seems me a very interesting mixer/ai. I'm also considering buying a mixer and an audio interface separately such as mackie's cfx12mkII or 1402 vlz3 and Focusrite scarlett 18i6.
    The global price is similar. Which setup do you prefer? Which are the benefits from getting two machines instead of one and viceversa?

    About monitors I'm considering YAMAHA HS50M and KRK RP5 ROKIT G2. But I can't decide which

    Can anyone help me?
    Thanks
     
  2. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    If you specifically want a mixer then go for something in the Onyx i series or the Presonus StudioLive or the Allen Heath ZED R16. The Mackie CFX line is not as good as the Onyx line. The VLZ3 is decent enough but the preamps in my opinion are not as good as the Onyx series.

    The monitors are going to be just studio monitors or are you wanting gig speakers? The two will not be the same.
     
  3. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    Thanks for you reply

    The presonus studiolive and the allen heath zed r16 are too expensive for me at the moment.
    The monitors are going to be mainly studio monitors. Exist any speaker that can be usable both for studio and gig?
     
  4. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    No. Studio monitors have a completely different design purpose. KRK makes some studio monitors that are decent. Mackie makes some powered monitors for clubs etc.
     
  5. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    ok, thank you
    I'll check the KRK's.
    Another question. What about the Alesis multimix firewire 16? It's cheaper than the onyx but is much worse?
     
  6. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    The Alesis is a POS.
     
  7. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    Excuse my ignorance but.. what is a POS? It's a control surface? Does it mean it can not be usable without a computer?
    thanks
     
  8. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    piece of .....
     
  9. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    jeje ok, I'm not anglophone, thanks
     
  10. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    All in one devices such as those mixers with internal analog to digital converters and a computer output are certainly well thought out, integrated devices. Sort of like a large Recreational Vehicle Motor Home that come in various sizes. As compared to having a pickup truck towing a Recreational Vehicle Trailer.

    Personally, I prefer to have external analog to digital converters to the computer. And separate consoles/mixers/preamps for their unique quality sound. Being able to use the same computer audio interface with different mixers/consoles/preamps will give you a wider choice of colors from the same line level analog to digital computer audio interfaces. So it gives you a better baseline to compare different audio devices by keeping your analog to digital computer audio interface consistent or the same. And this can also be a more economical way to go and to grow. You can increase your versatility by replacing and/or adding on to an existing mixer. Whereas, investing in a better analog to digital converter may improve sound quality but not your versatility. A difficult decision for many to say the least. But then again, some of this is based upon technical knowledge, proficiency & experience. So sometimes, the smart thing to do is remember that LESS IS MORE. Which may point you to one of those integrated mixers with a computer audio interface built-in to depending upon your technical knowledge & proficiency.

    I am practically the most unpractical, practical engineer.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  11. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Also make sure if the model of Onyx you are looking at records individual tracks/channels versus just the main fader.
     
  12. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    I'm absolutely new at audio recording, so my technical knowledge, proficiency & experience are null. I'm not thinking to mount a recording studio, so I'm not sure that my setup will grow up...

    I've checked the Onyx: 16x2 FireWire allows for simultaneous streaming of all channels, auxes and master L/R

    Thanks for your comments
     
  13. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    That is true for the 1640i, but I do not believe that is true for the 820i. The 820i only records the main fader. Page 7 of the 820i manual states this.

    This brings up a good point. Download and read the manuals of any gear you are thinking about purchasing. This can save a lot of wasted money on things that can't do what you want them to do.
     
  14. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Well-Known Member

    Back in the day before the Internet, I would go to my professional equipment supplier and ask if they could open one of the boxes so I could read the manual first. Of course, I also knew what I wanted and the specifications were the last thing I would look at. That's because I never purchased a piece of equipment solely based upon its specifications. That's particularly because if it was a piece of professional equipment, I would expect it to sound like a piece of professional equipment. And better looking specifications didn't mean it would sound better.

    I enjoy combining the worst with the best to come up with something professionally good.
    Mx. Remy Ann David
     
  15. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    Thanks for the advice. I was looking at the 1220i manual: Flexible FireWire routing with up to 12 channels pre/post EQ, aux sends and master L/R routable to computer which means I can record all channels separately, no?
    I can't look at technical specs because I don't know which values are better or worse
     
  16. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    Yes, the 1220i will record all 12 individual sticks plus L-R main fader.
     
  17. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    Ok, thanks for all replies.
    I think I have decided to buy an onyx 1220i. I will tell you something about it.
     
  18. daviddevic

    daviddevic Active Member

    And about microphone, wich is best for vocals? I'm not a singer and I will use it for pop-rock and jazz music:
    AKG D5, Shure SM58 or Sennheiser E840?
     
  19. beatdub

    beatdub Active Member

    About vocals, I think the best thing you could do is get a descent condenser mic, pop filter screen and set up a vocal booth. Our vocals always sounded bad until we got a rode ntk condenser. We closed off a corner of the carpeted room by wedging a sheet of hard foam insulation in a corner. Creating a dead space and taking away room sound is probably more important with vocals than which mic you use.
     
  20. TheJackAttack

    TheJackAttack Distinguished Member

    The two most widely used microphones for vocals are both dynamic mics and not condenser. Shure SM58 and the Electrovoice RE20. The runners up especially for live use are all dynamic mics too. Condensers are sometimes used in a studio but that is more dependent on the room, the voice, and the style of music.
     

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