1. Register NOW and become part of this fantastic knowledge base forum! This message will go away once you have registered.

Mixer question

Discussion in 'Recording' started by mannyfresh, Apr 17, 2005.

  1. mannyfresh

    mannyfresh Guest

    Hey, I'm a newbie and i was just wondering about having a mixer. Is there a point to having a mixer if you do computer recording? I use my laptop and I have a tascam us-122 and a tascam us-224 for my audio interface. Do i need to have a mixer? I'm just wonderin, and go easy on me...I'm a newbie, i've probably been doing a whole lot of things the wrong way, so i'm hoping i'll learn a couple things from this website. :D
     
  2. anonymous

    anonymous Guests

    Your not gonna learn sh*t from this web-site :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Just joking! :shock: Welcome to recording.org 8)
    As far as the mixing board goes, I don't use that type of set up BUT, I do know that alot of guys are using "interfaces" to link up to their computers. And they dont always need a mixer, if their not recording more than 1 or 2 tracks at a time.
    Who's using what brand names, that will help out Mannyfresh?
     
  3. LittleDogAudio

    LittleDogAudio Active Member

    A mixer, in your situation isn't "needed" but is a bonus. Like That Guy said, if you are tracking more than a couple of things at once, the mixer can be used for more mic pres'/multiple headphone sends and creating stem mixes from your daw.

    If these are not needed, save your $$$ for better outboard mic pre's.

    Chris
     
  4. mannyfresh

    mannyfresh Guest

    thanks for the info. Say though that I do want to record more than one or two tracks. A mixer is recomended? And also what should i use as better audio interface? I want to be able to record from 4 to 8 tracks simultaneously. And the tascam us-122 and the us-224 can only do four, but that takes up more room than i want and i know there are many more choices. Plus keep in mind that i'm using a laptop. What do u guys recomend me getting?
     
  5. lobsterman

    lobsterman Guest

    I read in another post a guy records into protools but mixes through an analog mixer. How does he do this? I dont understand how he can run each track through a mixer. How is this setup? Also once he gets a mix he is happy with does he go back into protools to record it?
     
  6. karbomusic

    karbomusic Active Member

    Hi lobsterman-

    His sound card probably has as many outputs as tracks used. So if he has 8 outputs on his soundcard he simply sends the output for each track in his recording software to each corresponing output on his soundcard/interface.

    He then simply plugs those outputs into his mixer and starts mixing with the mixer stereo outs going to his monitors. If he were using both the input and ouput sides of the inserts on the board, he could arrive at a "classic patching" for recording where the insert from say channel 1 on the board goes to the input/output of that same channel on the sound card just like it would on a tape machine.

    Now just plug a mic in, record your track that is coming in on the analog board then after recording hit the "flip switch" and play back and mix the audio on that same channel externally while leaving the software channel's eqs etc disabled (or not).

    Best regards-

    Karbo
     
  7. lobsterman

    lobsterman Guest

    "Now just plug a mic in, record your track that is coming in on the analog board then after recording hit the "flip switch" and play back and mix the audio on that same channel externally while leaving the software channel's eqs etc disabled (or not)."

    This part doesnt make sense to me. Can you try to say it a different way please?
     
  8. karbomusic

    karbomusic Active Member

    On many recording consoles you have a switch called "flip" that flips the channel on the board between monitoring the input as it comes from the mic and hearing what is played back on the tape. It is usually located at the top near the gain button for each channel.

    In other words with the flip switch in one position you hear what is coming in from the mic, and in the other position you can hear what is coming from the tape (what you just recorded from the mic).

    So... you set it so you can hear what is coming from the mic (recording to tape) then record. when you are ready to play back what you just recorded you hit the "flip" switch and listen. If you didnt flip the switch you couldnt hear the playback as you would still be "monitoring" what is coming from the mic...

    Without a flip switch you end up having channels on the board just for input and then the same number just for output. The flip switch lets you do this on one channel.

    Does that help?

    Karbo
     

Share This Page