Mixing & Mastering to DTS or AC3

Discussion in 'Tracking / Mixing / Editing' started by Questionmark, Nov 19, 2005.

  1. Questionmark

    Questionmark Guest

    I have a well equipped studio capable of mixing to 5.1. Problem is, I don't know exactly how to capture this mix and then burn it down to DTS or AC3. I know that some very expensive programs are capable of doing everything but as I stated before I only need to capture and burn. If anyone can help me in this area I would appreciate it.
    I have a Tascam DM24 and a good Sony surround amp and speakers for monitoring, and of course several DVD burners.
    Thank You.
     
  2. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    The programs are the cheap way to go. there are hardware encoders that dolby and sony make but they are pricey. The cheap way is to capture your 5.1 mixes into a daw, then encode the files. I think there are some fairly inexpensive encoders out there. I think a lot of DVD authoring software comes with an AC3 encoder.
     
  3. huub

    huub Guest

    Makes me think of a question: I recently mixed a project in 5.1, I left the rear channels in their original phase(is that a sentence?), because the mix was going to be mastered anyway, but; are the rear channels supposed to be phase reversed? would make sense soundpressure-wise, but maybe home surroundsets do this already for you?
    who has an answer?
     
  4. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    a home theater will reverse the phase if you tell it to do so during the encoding. Otherwise they won't. If you do or not is dependent on the program.
     
  5. JerryTubb

    JerryTubb Guest

    Personally I don't want the rear channels to be phase reversed. I want them to be in phase, exactly as they were mixed and mastered... not with some pseudo spacious effect applied.

    Apple's A-Pack (AC-3 encoder) has a check box that, iirc, defaults to phase reverse, I always disable it.

    For my money DTS sounds far superior to AC-3.
     
  6. huub

    huub Guest

    ,kay, so it's best to leave this up to mastering I understand?
    B.T.W I'm not talking about creating pseudo surround, if you send the exact same signal to both front and rear, the signal is basically out of phase, because the speakers move the sound in the opposite direction..
    Hmm. I'm not sure if I'm explaining myself properly.. :-?
     
  7. JerryTubb

    JerryTubb Guest

    oops! duplicate posts
     
  8. JerryTubb

    JerryTubb Guest

    Mixing to 5.1 Surround is an Artform !

    Not an automatic process where you take a stereo mix, send it through a 5.1 processor and voila'... surround.
    Dolby Pro Logic can do that without you.

    I suggest you buy some great Music Video DVDs or SACDs that were mixed specifically in 5.1 surround by some of the industry's best, analyze what they did and -learn- to mix in surround.

    May I suggest Pink Floyd's "Dark Side Of the Moon" SACD,

    -and- John Hiatt "Live In Austin, TX" DVD as examples.

    Cheers
     
  9. Michael Fossenkemper

    Michael Fossenkemper Distinguished past mastering moderator Well-Known Member

    Also fleetwood mac's romours is a nice one too.
     
  10. Questionmark

    Questionmark Guest

    Trying again

    My God have we gotten off track. In my first sentence I stated that I had a very well equipped studio capable of mixing in 5.1. The problem I’m having is downmixing these 6 discrete signals to a DVD encrypted in either DTS or AC3. (ie. The Wall was processed exactly the way you forementioned and in my opinion is all over the place, I’d put my money on the Eagles.) :shock:
     
  11. JerryTubb

    JerryTubb Guest

    Re: Trying again

    Oops ! I couldn't tell from your original post that you had 6 channels ready to encode. Sorry about the miscue. The way I see it, you have two options... or some combination of both.

    1. Mix from your Tascam DM24 through a hardware DTS or AC-3 encoder directly to DAWs digital input. Then use some sort of Authoring software to assemble the components and burn a DVD. I suppose you could go directly from a hardware encoder to a stand-alone DVD recorder, but it would limit your options (never tried it this way).

    2. Transfer from your Tascam DM24 into a DAW, then use DTS or AC-3 encoding software, then use some Authoring software to assemble the components and burn a DVD.

    The hardware encoders are pretty pricey.

    The software encoders are very affordable.

    The Authoring software you select would depend on your platform (PC or Mac) and the purpose of the disc.... DVD-Audio, DVD-Video, Slide Show with music, etc.

    Best Regards
     

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