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Monitors vs Headphones

Discussion in 'Monitoring & Headphones' started by Rhody, May 17, 2004.

  1. Rhody

    Rhody Guest

    Hi, new here :D

    I read through the monitor thread and was really impressed by all the info posted.

    As a singer/songwriter, I've started to record my own music. It's the best way to try ideas out and bring a more 'together' product to the studio.

    Monitoring is very important to me: so far I've been using headphones and they seem to work for the most part, but I'm definitely interested in speaker monitors if it's the better option.

    What are your thoughts on using speaker monitors compared to quality headphones? is there much of a difference?

  2. AudioGaff

    AudioGaff Distinguished Member

    Feb 23, 2001
    Silicon Valley
    VERY BIG difference. Most people listen to speakers so that should be the main focus. Headphones are good as an additional source to check your results on just as more than one pair of speakers are or checking on a boom-box.
    audiokid likes this.
  3. Rhody

    Rhody Guest


    guess I need to add monitors to my growing list of items to buy

    man, music is sucking up money quicker than my ex!

    at least it provides more fun at night ;)
  4. Tenson

    Tenson Active Member

    Dec 17, 2003
    Home Page:
    In my experiance if you mix on headphones it tends to sound bad on speakers, but if yu mix on speakers it still sounds good on headphones as well.
  5. Steve Jones

    Steve Jones Active Member

    Jul 25, 2003
    Apart from the very real danger of degrading your ears, mixing and tracking on headphones is not really viable because:

    All the left signal goes only to the left ear, and all the right signal to the right ear, hence you cannot hear if things are out of phase.

    Reverb sounds different in terms of balance.

    Lack of low frequency reproduction means that undesirable bass material goes unnoticed.

    Ear fatigue sets in really quickly, hence you compensate by adding too much high EQ.

    Control room "mishaps" such as sudden digital feedback loops and the like can blow your ears if you are monitoring loudly.

    You can mess up your hairdo.

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