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Moving from Logic 5.5(PC) to Mac setup

Discussion in 'Logic' started by STX, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. STX

    STX Member

    Jan 15, 2012
    For the last ten years I have being using a PC set up to run Logic Audio. I'm still using the Audiowerk card purchased 12 years ago. Although the system works fine I feel it time to move into the 21 Century and get a Mac setup.
    What would be my best option in terms of computer (i.e. What Mac) external midi controller and Audio interface? I know nothing about Macs

    Thanking you for your help in advance

  2. IIRs

    IIRs Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2005
    Any modern mac will be a step up from your 10 yr old PC. I'm not a mac guy so I won't comment further on that.

    As far as midi controllers and audio interfaces are concerned, this very much depends on you: do you need a full size weighted piano keyboard, or will a little 2-octave keys-with-knobs model suit you better? Or maybe you have a keyboard already and you just need midi IO? How many audio inputs and outputs do you require? Do you need instrument and mic inputs, or will just line ins do? More information required!
  3. thatjeffguy

    thatjeffguy Active Member

    Oct 31, 2009
    Vashon Island, Washington
    Home Page:
    Any computer you purchase now will eventually become underpowered as software complexities expand to fill the extent of available technology. As a result,n I have always found it to be cost effective to purchase the most powerful computer available for my studio knowing that it will be useful a couple of years longer than a less powerful unit as software is updated.
    I am a long-term Mac user and currently run a four year old 8 core (dual quad-core processor) Mac Pro that is not yet straining in any area. But I record audio tracks almost exclusively, not virtual instruments or heavy-demand plugins. Those can really tax a CPU and RAM.
    So I would recommend you buy as powerful a machine as your current budget requires unless you know that the type of demand you plan on placing on it is minimal and will remain so in the foreseeable future.

  4. ouzo77

    ouzo77 Active Member

    Jan 16, 2006
    Nuremberg, Germany
    Home Page:
    As far as expandablity goes the Mac Pro would be the best one. But it is the most expensive.
    An iMac QuadCore would be more than enough as far as CPU power goes. But you can't add any interior hdd's and are limited to a few USB and Firewire ports. Though with the new Thunderbolt port it is only a matter of time until some manufacturers will offer Thunderbolt hubs with additional USB, Firewire and eSATA ports to really use the expansion possibilities of this interface.

    Personally, I would wait for Thunderbolt hubs before deciding which one to take (which are announced for this year).

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