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Near Field Monitoring

Discussion in 'Recording' started by starscream2010, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. I am not sure if I should post this question in this forum or not but here it goes... I record in my house (rock bands mostly, record in one room and mix in a section of a large bedroom) using a DAW with Nuendo 2.0 and a pair of NS10's with a Hafler power amp and gotten very good results at this point. But I have found that as I am acquiring better quality gear (mics, pres, compressors) I have been thinking about adding an additional set of monitors perhaps the Event Precision 8, something with a better low end, but that is neither here nor there. What I am wanting to know/confirm (sorry about beating around the bush) is that in my very limited understanding of ‘acoustics’ when monitoring with near-fields, not as much room treatment is needed because of the distance between you and the speakers. Is my perception WAY off target? I thought that room treatment was more for midfield or large monitoring systems. In recent weeks I get the feeling that I might be wrong in this perception and that I might want to spend $1000 or so, on some acoustic panels like Real Traps or something along those lines. Try to keep in mind that this is my bedroom and the treatment needs to be somewhat attractive so that my wife can live with it as well, so I don't plan to cover my walls floor-to-ceiling in Auralex. The dimensions of the room are roughly 20x20 with 12ft ceilings; it is carpeted with heavy drapes as well. I hope that I have provided enough information any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Nick
     
  2. TheArchitect

    TheArchitect Active Member

    Every room has issues, particularly in the low end, if they weren't purpose built for audio.

    Early reflections occur even with near fields and they can really screw up what you are hearing both in terms of EQ and clarity/imaging.

    Treating your listening environment is definately worth investigating.
     

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