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new to home recording

Discussion in 'Recording' started by bobbyRIVERSIDE, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. and i was wondering if i purchased this for basic demoing of my band would i need anything else for it? interfaces? preamps? or could i just run this USb direct into my HP laptop?

  2. GeckoMusic

    GeckoMusic Guest

    That only records a stereo mix via the USB. It would work, but would be limiting.

    What is the motivation for doing the recording yourself? Is recording something you want to get into? For the cost of that mixer you could probably record a few songs in a local studio. You get to do what you do best (play), and get someone with much more recording experiance to worry about the tracks.

    If you want to play around with mixing, the studio will probably give you stems of the tracks if you ask.

    I'm not trying to discourage you from recording, just want to make sure it is something that you want to do.
  3. ive wanted to record since i was about 15 and i just really want to start doing all my bands stuff and others stuff. just have limted funds right now and want to start small and work my way up
  4. GeckoMusic

    GeckoMusic Guest

    An audio interface like the presounus FP10 is popular, and Reaper for software is a good place to start.
  5. Codemonkey

    Codemonkey Distinguished Member

    Dec 11, 2007
    Scotland, UK
    Kristal is free and will do, but Reaper is probably miles better. The VST support is probably not broken too.
  6. RemyRAD

    RemyRAD Guest

    Sep 26, 2005
    bobbyRIVERSIDE, you've been wanting to record since you were 15? So you're 16 now??

    Not to put down the Peavey thingy but you would be better served by a dedicated multitrack computer interface that comes bundled with some decent multitrack software. Such as the FP 10 mentioned earlier, by Presonus. Now that's assuming you have a fairly late-model & reasonably powerful laptop or desktop computer. If that's not the case then one of those control rooms in a box by Roland may be a better bet to start off with? You won't have to deal with the computers idiosyncrasies and the recordings will be of similar quality. Especially since most of the same chips & converters are used in both devices. You can still utilize your computer to put the finishing touches on your stereo mixes. Also duplicating your CDs may be easier that way?

    Just getting started after 47 years
    Ms. Remy Ann David

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